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The Complete Blue Horizon Sessions: 1967-1969 (1999) - Fleetwood Mac


    Featuring »

Bob Brunning, Mick Fleetwood, Peter Green, Danny Kirwan, John McVie, Jeremy Spencer

    Tracklisting »
Disc One:
My Heart Beat Like A Hammer Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-12-11, Running Time: 3:33
  Comments: Master version with studio talk. (Take 2) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Merry Go Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 4:19
  Comments: (Take 2 - master version with studio talk/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Long Grey Mare Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967, Running Time: 2:12
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Hellhound On My Trail Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 2:04
  Comments: (Take 1 - complete master version with studio talk (at end)/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Shake Your Moneymaker Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-12-11, Running Time: 3:11
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London. Includes studio talk.
Looking For Somebody Listen.Lyrics available
  Running Time: 2:49
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London or Decca Studio, West Hampstead London.
No Place To Go Listen.Lyrics available
  Running Time: 3:20
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London or Decca Studio, West Hampstead London.
My Baby's Good To Me Listen.Lyrics available
  Running Time: 2:49
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 2:54
  Comments: (Take 5) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 3:15
  Comments: (Take 6) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
The World Keep On Turning Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 2:27
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Got To Move Listen.Lyrics available
  Running Time: 3:18
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
My Heart Beat Like A Hammer Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-12-11, Running Time: 3:42
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Merry Go Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: :54
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/incomplete) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/incomplete) Part 1 of track 15, disc 1. Total running time of track is 6:08. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 2 - previously unissued) Part 2 of track 15, disc 1. Total running time of track is 6:08. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 3 - previously unissed/false start) Part 3 of track 15, disc 1. Total running time of track is 6:08. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 4 - previously unissed/incomplete) Part 4 of track 15, disc 1. Total running time of track is 6:08. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 5 - complete master version/renix) Part 1 of track 16, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:08. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Loved Another Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: Take 6 - previously unissed/incomplete) Part 2 of track 16, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:08. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissed/false start) Part 1 of track 17, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:28. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 2 - previously unissed/false start) Part 2 of track 17, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:28. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 3 - previously unissed/false start) Part 3 of track 17, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:28. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 4 - previously unissed/false start) Part 4 of track 17, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:28. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 5 - previously unissed/false start) Part 5 of track 17, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:28. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Cold Black Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 6 - complete master version/remix) Part 6 of track 17, disc 1. Total running time of track is 5:28. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Hellhound On My Trail Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 3:05
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Includes different lyrics, billed as "You're So Evil". Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I'm Coming Home To Stay Listen.Lyrics available
  Running Time: 2:27
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Disc Two:
Stop Messin' Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28, Running Time: 2:34
  Comments: (Take 4 - master album version with studio talk/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I've Lost My Baby Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 4:16
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Rollin' Man Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 2:52
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Dust My Broom Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 2:51
  Comments: Recorded at CSB Studio, New Bond Street, London. Elmore James did slightly change the lyrics to "Dust My Broom" in later years & those are the lyrics that Jeremy Spencer sings on this version of the song.
Love That Burns Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 5:02
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London
Doctor Brown Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 3:43
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love Tonight Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 3:26
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
If You Be My Baby Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 3:51
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Evenin' Boogie Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 2:39
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Lazy Poker Blues Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 2:34
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Coming Home Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 2:38
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Trying So Hard To Forget Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-00, Running Time: 4:45
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Stop Messin' Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/false start) Part 1 of track 13, disc 2. Total running time of track is 4:32. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Stop Messin' Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28
  Comments: (Take 2 - previously unissued/false start) Part 2 of track 13, disc 2. Total running time of track is 4:32. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Stop Messin' Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28
  Comments: (Take 3 - previously unissued/incomplete) Part 3 of track 13, disc 2. Total running time of track is 4:32. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Stop Messin' Round Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28, Running Time: 2:47
  Comments: (Take 5 - master single version/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Held My Baby Last Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968, Running Time: 4:26
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Mystery Boogie Listen.
  Date Performance: 1968, Running Time: 2:51
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Disc Three:
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28, Running Time: 6:55
  Comments: Version # 2 (remake) (Take 4 - complete version/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London. Strings/horns overdub sessions on May 15, 1968 at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Rambling Pony Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-09-09, Running Time: 3:32
  Comments: (Complete master version/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
I Believe My Time Ain't Long Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-09-09, Running Time: 3:01
  Comments: (Master version with studio talk/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
The Sun Is Shining Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-02-22, Running Time: 3:10
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Albatross Listen.Instrumental Midi available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 3:08
  Comments: Stereo Version. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London. Original Release: Blue Horizon #57-3145 (A-Side). Source: Original analogue tape. Chart: Billboard US Hot 100 Singles Peak Position: 104 Peak Dates: Apr 5, 1969 & Apr 12, 1969 Weeks on Charts: 4 Chart: Billboard UK Top 50/40 Singles Peak Position: 1 (2 times) Peak Dates: Feb 8, 1969 & Jun 1973 Weeks on Charts: 35
Black Magic Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-02-22, Running Time: 2:54
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London. Chart: Billboard UK Top 50/40 Singles Peak Position: 37 Peak Dates: May 4, 1968 Weeks on Charts: 7
Jigsaw Puzzle Blues Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 1:33
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Like Crying Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968, Running Time: 2:29
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-11
  Comments: Version #1 (Take 1 - previously unissued/false start) Part 1 of track 9, disc 3. Total running time of track is 11:33. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-11
  Comments: Version #1 (Take 2 - previously unissued/incomplete) Part 2 of track 9, disc 3. Total running time of track is 11:33. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-11
  Comments: Version #1 (Take 3 - previously unissued) Part 3 of track 9, disc 3. Total running time of track is 11:33. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28
  Comments: Version #2 Remake (Take 1 - previously unissued) Part 1 of track 10, disc 3. Total running time of track is 13:06. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28
  Comments: Version #2 Remake (Take 2 - previously unissued) Part 2 of track 10, disc 3. Total running time of track is 13:06. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-28, Running Time: 6:18
  Comments: (Take 3 - previously unissed) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Need Your Love So Bad Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 6:18
  Comments: (USA Version - Previously unissed) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London (Overdub session).
Disc Four:
Watch Out Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:19
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Ooh Baby Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:05
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
South Indiana Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:21
  Comments: (Take 1) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
South Indiana Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:46
  Comments: (Take 2) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Last Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 5:01
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Red Hot Jam Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 5:55
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued with studio talk) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Red Hot Jam Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 6:02
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
I'm Worried Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:47
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
I Held My Baby Last Night Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 5:16
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Madison Blues Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:55
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
I Can't Hold Out Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:49
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Bobby's Rock Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:59
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
I Need Your Love Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:32
  Comments: Master version with previously unissued studio talk. (Take 2) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Horton's Boogie Woogie Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:37
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
I Got The Blues Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:59
  Comments: Master version with previously unissued false start. Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Disc Five:
World's In A Tangle Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 5:25
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Talk With You Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:28
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Like It This Way Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:24
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Someday Soon Baby Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 7:36
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Hungry Country Girl Listen.
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 5:46
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Black Jack Blues Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 5:08
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Everyday I Have The Blues Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:55
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Rockin' Boogie Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:58
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
My Baby's Gone Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:04
  Comments: Stereo Version. Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studio, Chicago, IL. Source: Original analogue tape
Sugar Mama Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 49
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/incomplete) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Sugar Mama Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 6:08
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Homework Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:20
  Comments: Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Honey Boy Blues Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 2:20
  Comments: (Previously unissued/incomplete) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
I Need Your Love Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 2:15
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/incomplete) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Horton's Boogie Woogie Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:40
  Comments: (Take 2 - previously unissued) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Have A Good Time Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:54
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
That's Wrong Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 4:12
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Rock Me Baby Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1969-01-04, Running Time: 3:23
  Comments: (Previously unissued) Recorded at Chess Ter-Mar Studios, Chicago
Disc Six:
Drifting Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967, Running Time: 3:31
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Leaving Town Blues Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-12-11, Running Time: 3:09
  Comments: (Take 5 - master version/remix with previously unissued false start) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Watch Out Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 4:46
  Comments: (Take 2 - complete master version/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/false start) Part 1 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 2 - previously unissued/false start) Part 2 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 3 - previously unissued/incomplete) Part 3 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 4 - previously unissued/false start) Part 4 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 5 - previously unissued/false start) Part 5 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 6 - previously unissued/false start) Part 6 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 7 - previously unissued/false start) Part 7 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
A Fool No More Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 8 - master version/alternative original mix) Part 8 of track 4, disc 6. Total running time of track is 7:59. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Mean Old Fireman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/false start) Part 1 of track 5, disc 6. Total running time of track is 4:06. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Mean Old Fireman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22
  Comments: (Take 2 - master version/alternative original mix) Part 2 of track 5, disc 6. Total running time of track is 4:06. Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Can't Afford To Do It Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967, Running Time: 2:02
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Fleetwood Mac Listen.Instrumental
  Date Performance: 1967-08-00, Running Time: 3:54
  Comments: Recorded at Decca Studios, West Hampstead, London
Worried Dream Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-04-11, Running Time: 6:55
  Comments: (Take 1 - master version/remix with previously unissed incomplete take) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Love That Woman Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968, Running Time: 2:32
  Comments: (Alternative original mix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Allow Me One More Show Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967, Running Time: 2:58
  Comments: (Alternative original mix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
First Train Home Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-08-00, Running Time: 4:05
  Comments: (Mono) Recorded at Decca Studios, West Hampstead, London
Rambling Pony Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967, Running Time: 2:53
  Comments: No. 2 (Alternative original mix) Recorded at either CBS Studio, New Bond Street or Decca Studio, West Hampstead, London.
Watch Out Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1967-11-22, Running Time: 3:06
  Comments: (Take 1 - previously unissued/incomplete) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Something Inside Of Me Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 3:54
  Comments: (Take 1) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Something Inside Of Me Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 4:05
  Comments: (Take 2 - previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Something Inside Of Me Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 4:16
  Comments: (Take 3 - previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
One Sunny Day Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 3:11
  Comments: (Master version/remix) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London. Harmonica can be heard on this track (presumably played by Peter Green). However, Mike Vernon does not list this instrument as being played on this track.
Without You Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 4:30
  Comments: Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
Coming Your Way Listen.Lyrics available
  Date Performance: 1968-10-06, Running Time: 2:59
  Comments: (Take 6 - previously unissued) Recorded at CBS Studio, New Bond Street, London.
    Guest Appearances »

John(ny) Almond, Duster (Tony/Anthony) Bennett, J(ohn) T. Brown, Willie Dixon, David Honeyboy Edwards, Steve/Stephen Gregory, Buddy (George) Guy, (Big) Walter (Shakey) Horton, David/Dave Howard, David Katz, S. P. Leary, Christine McVie, Otis Spann, Roland Vaughan, Mike Vernon

    Released »

1999-09-16

    Format »

Domestic Vinyl/CD Album

    Other Appearances »
Buster Brown (Songwriter), J(ohn) T. Brown (Songwriter), Dave Clark (Songwriter), Arthur Big Boy Crudup (Songwriter), Clifford (G.) Davis (Adams) (Songwriter), Willie Dixon (Songwriter), David Honeyboy Edwards (Songwriter), Waymon Glasco (Songwriter), Peter Green (Songwriter), Peter Green (Songwriter), (Big) Walter (Shakey) Horton (Songwriter), Howlin' Wolf (Chester Burnett) (Songwriter), Melvin (Lil' Son) Jackson (Songwriter), Elmore James (Songwriter), Little Willie (William Edgar) John (Mertis, Jr.) (Songwriter), Robert Johnson (Songwriter), Joe (Joseph) Josea (Bihari) (Songwriter), B(lues) B(oy) (Riley) King (Songwriter), Danny Kirwan (Songwriter), Danny Kirwan (Songwriter), Lafayette Leake (Songwriter), Little Walter (Walter Jacobs) (Songwriter), Memphis Slim (Peter Chatman) (Songwriter), Al(berta) Perkins (Songwriter), Jimmy Rogers (James A. Lane) (Songwriter), Otis Rush (Songwriter), Marshall E. Sehorn (Songwriter), Otis Spann (Songwriter), Jeremy Spencer (Songwriter), Jeremy Spencer (Songwriter), Jules (Julius Jeramiah) Taub (Bihari) (Songwriter), Homesick James Williamson (Songwriter), Richard Vernon (Co-Ordination), Terence Ibbot(t) (Design), Terry Noonan (Strings Under The Direction Of), (Jet) Martin Celmins (Liner Notes), Mike Vernon (Liner Notes), Terence Ibbot(t) (Layout Design), Marshall Chess (Produced By), Mike Vernon (Produced By), Stu Black (Engineered By), Mike Ross(-Trevor) (Engineered By), Marshall Chess (Session Co-Ordination), Willie Dixon (Session Co-Ordination), Neil (The Curmudgeon) Slaven (Session Co-Ordination), Mike Vernon (Session Co-Ordination), Bernie O'Gormon (Remixing), Terry Noonan (Horns Under The Direction Of), Mickey 'Guitar' Baker (String Arrangement), Jeff Lowenthal (Box Front Cover Photographs), Peter Beard (Booklet Photographs), Bob Brunning (Booklet Photographs), Bob Brunning (Booklet Photographs), (Jet) Martin Celmins (Booklet Photographs), Mick Fleetwood (Booklet Photographs), Mick Fleetwood (Booklet Photographs), Jon Frost (Booklet Photographs), Terence Ibbot(t) (Booklet Photographs), Jeff Lowenthal (Booklet Photographs), John McVie (Booklet Photographs), John McVie (Booklet Photographs)

    Record Label »
Sire/Sony

    Catalogue Number »

73003-2 (Sire) 494641 2 (Sony)

    Running Time »

403:14

    Liner Notes »

Recollecting how it was...

Extracts of a convesation between Mike Vernon and Peter Green recollecting how it was.....

PG: “We began to talk about forming a band when I left John Mayall. I left partly because I felt John was getting too jazzy. At first I was intending to go to Chicago and play with blues musicians playing in the clubs then. In the Bluesbreakers John encouraged me to be a blues student and he would make fabulous tapes for me of guys like Robert Nighthawk, Little Walter and Junior Wells....”

MV: “...and you’d already played in the studio here in England with Eddie Boyd and Paul Butterfield.”

PG: “Yeah, I was also listening to records by less famous Chicago bluesmen... street musicians like Maxwell Street Jimmy and Big John Wrencher. What I really wanted was to go there and find out if the younger guys playing blues then (the mid-60’s) still had that old Chicago blues feeling. But then an American girl told me that I wouldn’t be able to play anywhere without a work permit, so I decided not to go. Then you talked about your plans for Blue Horizon and that’s where the idea for Fleetwood Mac came about, I guess”.

MV; Do you remember how you insisted that any band of yours should not go over the same ground that you did with the Bluesbreakers? Which was why you even turned down the deal we got offered with Decca - John’s label - after recording that four-track demo EP. Also, I seem to remember that you originally had a three-piece band in mind”.

PG: “I liked Buddy Guy. And over here there was Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. But then didn’t you suggest that I go up North and hear Jeremy Spencer?”

MV: “Yes, and the rest, as they say, is history! But you know, it only struck me very recently when I was going through all the old multi-tracks that even with Jeremy in the band you mostly still played as a a three-piece. And of course, those four tracks on that demo EP that landed us a distribution deal with CBS just featured three of you”.

PG: “Jeremy wouldn’t learn any of my songs - that’s why. He did do when we recorded “Oh Well”...he played piano on the B-side of that. But I was never sure if the reason why he didn’t join in more was that he wouldn’t, or he couldn’t. He was a music fanatic - I’m sure of that. When we wrere on tour he would always go to record shops and spend hours looking for rare rock ‘n’ roll singles. But with us he would only move at his own speed. I wondered recently about Jeremy doing all those voices and imitating the thousands of characters he build up over the years....I wonder if that was his way of saying to Mick Fleetwood - who he used to look to - ‘My job is on the line here if I’m not on-stage full-time...’.”

MV: “And it was Mick who had the idea of bringing Danny in”.

PG: “Yeah,...Danny was a clever boy who got ideas for his guitar playing by listening to all that old-fashioned roaring twenties big band stuff. After he joined us his cycle changed a lot from the blues he played with his old band Boilerhouse. But he was still so into it that he cried when he played - I could almost hear Danny crying as he played”.

MV: “I clearly remember being completely blown away when I first heard Danny rehearsing with Boilerhouse. He went on and on at me to go and hear them - they actually used to practice in a basement boiler-room you know. After going along there I think I even rang you up to say that you’ve got to hear this young kid - he sounds just like Lowell Fulson. One day I told Danny himself and he just looked blank and said ‘Who’s Lowell Fulson?’. His style did change radically once he joined Fleetwood Mac...the only thing that remotely sounds like that old Texas-school-of-blues thing he played so uncannily well in Boilerhouse is ‘Like It This Way’ on the Chess sessions.”

PG: “The best thing he ever wrote was a single they recorded after I left - ‘Dragonfly’. That should have been a hit - it was a lovely song”.

MV: “I never got the impression that any of you were really going for a hit single back in those days - I know I was, but as a record producer that’s a bit different. Most bands used to do it for the buzz of playing live - that’s what they loved. They’d want to put out good singles for their following but not necessarily go for hit singles”.

PG: “‘Need Your Love So Bad’ was our first minor hit and what I did think at the time was would it have been a hit without those old age strings added”.

MV: “Well, we’ll never know the answer to that, but I do remember having a bit of a fight with the band to get the violins on. I won in the end because I felt very strongly that the record would get far more radio airplay with them there. I’d heard a B.B. King track that had strings on and I thought it was a magical sound. So I then got Mickey ‘Guitar’ Baker to do the arrangement”.

PG: “It’s not the arrangement that’s old fashioned, it’s the actual sound of the strings. It sounds like really old blokes were playing it...or old women”.

MV: “You’re right, it was. It was David Katz, a well-known violin leader from Wembley Park or somewhere like that. And you know I’ve unearthed every single version you ever did of that song including the first one with Christine Perfect, as she was then, playing piano...which is an absolute hoot. On the final version she plays organ. Heaven knows what you’re going to think of the complete version which is seven minutes long and it’s got strings all the way through it! Don’t you remember we were going to put it out as Part One and Part Two with the second half of the song faded up on the B-side?”

PG: “Oh yeah, that’s right... well, I’ll have to listen to it again with that in mind - what you’ve just told me now. Tell me something else; why did you release ‘Greeny’ when I was with John - because it’s only a sound check isn’t it?”

MV: “It’s great though....”

PG: “People do say that. But it doesn’t sound good enough to me, and so I just tell them we were just mucking about with the tape still running and it really wasn’t anything like a finished track”.

MV: “But you’re the one who cursed me out during the Chess sessions for not having the tapes rolling! You looked towards where I was in the control room, and obviously a bit annoyed, you said ‘Why don’t you keep the tapes running all the time?’. To which I made some remark about the fact that we have to change tape occasionally because it runs out. But the point is that sometimes you do record when people don’t expect you to, and you sometimes get magic. My recollection of the way we worked is that a lot of things in the studio were done off the cuff and done quickly because we never had the amount of time that we should have had. ‘Albatross’ was the first exception: we spent two days recording and mixing that, which in those days was a huge chunk of time to spend on just one track. And look what happened”.

PG: “I never expected it. Before you have a hit record you really don’t expect one to come”.

MV: “And, remember, for nearly a month after it’s release it didn’t happen....it was only when Top Of The Pops played a snatch of it at the very end of the show as the credits came up that the BBC got interested and then you were booked for Dee Time and things took off from there - at a rate of 60,000 copies sold per week. But wasn’t the sad thing that the band never got to appear live on TOTP because the week it reached number one in England we were in Chicago doing the ‘Blues Jam at Chess’ sessions”.

PG: “I just could not play in that studio, and yet I was fine that same night jamming down at the Pepper Lounge club wasn’t I? It was packed and the whole place was listening. There was something horrible about Chess: I was expecting it to be all sort of groovy and have carpets, instead it was a great big studio with a wooden floor: it was more like a school-hall or something. And when I listen to Sugar Mama now from that session it’s so violent that I wonder what all those guys must have been thinking hearing me like that and knowning that they’ve soon got to come out and play!”.

MV: “I don’t think you played quite as well on those sessions as I hoped you would, but Jeremy was the one that played really well - he was like a pig in shit because J.T. Brown was staring down at him. There was Jeremy blissfully in awe and thinking to himself, ‘I’m standing next to the man who played saxophone on all those Elmore James records’. Meanwhile, I was having a great time recording all these Chicago legends and afterwards coming away with totally unexpected gems. I think we were incredibly lucky”.

PG: “But that was the thing with the band as well - we were lucky. We were like puppies - young guys who should’ve rehearsed more but still got lucky. I’m learning to play much better nowadays. I’m learning a lot more, and when I learn it does sometimes feel like a foothold: I sometimes think to myself, ‘This is better...this sounds good...this could lead to jazz, and so perhaps I’m gonna be alright after all’. The day you stop putting down jazz you’ll be alright”.

MV: “ ‘ This could lead to jazz’...I must remember that, it’s a good quote. But in fairness to Mick, Jeremy, John and Danny, I must say that of all the blues bands I was involved with back then, nobody thrilled an audience like Fleetwood Mac; you were the only band to create hysteria with a 12-bar blues format. You know, you’d go to a John Mayall gig and OK, everybody was in to what John was doing, sure, but with you the crowd went bananas from the moment you walked out on stage. The records we made were a fairly good representation of that kind of excitement; but if I put my hand on my heart would have to say that probably we never actually really captured the live performance in a studio - with the exception of ‘Stop Messing Around’ from the ‘Mr. Wonderful’ album. Maybe what we should have donw was to actually record the band in a live situation: maybe at CBS but with an audience of a few hundred people in. At the time I never thought of it and I wish I had. That would have been some album.”

PG: “Maybe”.

‘Jet’ Martin Celmins
June 1999

Forward

As I look back over some thirty-seven years in the recording industry it never ceases to amaze me how many projects of one nature or another have passed through my hands. The variety in musical styles is truly diverse and the list seemingly unending. Thankfully the percentage of successes as opposed to failures is sufficient to have me thinking that perhaps I might have been doing something right all this time. Many of the major chart successes that bear my name as producer however are not of a blues nature despite the fact that I have found it difficult to shake the label of being thought of only as a producer of blues based product. David Bowie, Focus, Bloodstone, Olympic Runners, Rocky Sharpe & The Replays and Six Was Nine are most definitely not blues acts and yet all have seen chart action with your truly taking the production credits. John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers (featuring Eric Clapton, Peter Green and Mick Taylor successively), Savoy Brown Blue Band, Ten Years After, Chicken Shack, Christine Perfect, Fleetwood Mac, Jimmy Witherspoon, Freddie King and Bo Diddley number as the leading players in my blues production curriculum vitae. In terms of international profile on would have to consider Fleetwood Mac the most successful of that particular list. In reality though my involvement with the original band was, sad to say, all too fleeting - barely two years from the demo date at Decca that started the ball rolling to the ill-fated ‘Man Of The World’ sessions.

We have to travel back in time some thirty-two years when my career as a staff producer at The Decca Record Co. Ltd. came to an end as a direct result of that company declining the opportunity to sign Peter Green’s new band. The powers that be at Decca did not feel it in their best interest to let this act be released via a new label identity which was to be a designated blues only label. In hindsight an extremely short sighted viewpoint to have adopted. Their loss and my gain. Accordingly I took the product elsewhere and secured a deal with CBS (now Sony) and in this manner was Blue Horizon Records introduced to the unsuspecting world at large. I was politely asked to leave my salaried job at Decca and thus did I become an Independant Producer - a title and position I hold to this very day.

The growth, success and subsequent demise of the Blue Horizon label has been documented on several occasions both in print and most recently via the release of ‘The Blue Horizon Story 1965-1970 Vol. 1’ on Sony/Columbia. That 3 CD Box Set contains seventy titles tracing the label’s history from the first release by Howlin’ Wolf’s ex-guitarist Hubert Sumlin (a limited edition single of ninety-nine copies) right up to the ‘B’ side of the last single release by Los Angeles outfit Bacon Fat. There are a number of previously unreleased titles and demo tapes along with those chart successes that were alluded to earlier. Fleetwood Mac is represented by four tracks - the plug side of the band’s first Blue Horizon single featuring Lichfield’s very own Elmore James sound-a-like Jeremy Spencer; ‘Black Magic Woman’ (later to become a sizable US cover for Carlos Santana) ; a version of Little Willie John’s blues ballad ‘Need Your Love So Bad’ and the haunting and hugely successful instrumental ‘Albatross’. A great deal of research went into that release and at the time there was little written proof to be had from the Sony archives indicating that previously unreleased or undocumented material lay in the vaults and certainly not by Fleetwood Mac.

The initial reaction to and success of that box set resulted in my receiving a request from both Phil Savil at Sony UK and Seymour Stein of Sire NY to put together the definitive Fleetwood Mac Box Set covering the band’s Blue Horizon recorded output. Keen to do the best possible job, I went into research mode. Exhaustive calls and correspondence with Richard and Steve at Sony Archives turned up some hitherto uncharted territory. Some (not all regrettably) of the original multi-track tapes still existed. In the case of a handful of titles there appeared to be alternate takes to those that had been previously released on vinyl and there were. There would almost certainly be some interesting and perhaps revealing studio banter between takes. There was. Could there even be a previously unlisted title that appeared, as it were, out of the either? Yes.

And so this FLEETWOOD MAC BOX SET was born. Originally planned to be a 4 CD pack it quickly mutated to 6 CDs as further new material was unearthed. It’s all here. Alternative takes; false starts and breakdowns; studio chat including enough expletives to turn the air bluer than blue; previously unheard and unknown titles as well as a number that prove to be blueprints for subsequent versions that would appear on the RepriseThen Play On’ album. Well over six hours of playing time. As Peter Greenbaum might have put it: ‘Good luck!’

Mike Vernon

CHAPTER ONE

CD 1 Fleetwood Mac

As an introduction to the notes that follow I would only wish to say that it is my sincere hope that they will make pleasant and informative reading and act as a worthwhile companion to the musical contents contained herein. I will do my best to recall the events of those early years whilst working with Fleetwood Mac in the pious hope that they will offer some insight into the relationships built between record label, producer, musician and management. I will add my own personal thoughts and recollections of events as I best remember them but only when and where they seem prudent. Onward then and into battle.

The initial Blue Horizon single featuring Peter Green’s Fleetwood Mac achieved only moderate success following it’s release in January 1968. There was a certain air of disappointment in the camp at the time but any glum looks there might have been were soon turned to smiles following the release and almost immediate chart status for the now legendary ‘dog and dustbin’ album. ‘Fleetwood Mac’ reached the #4 spot in the UK album charts on 2nd March 1968 and indeed remained on the charts for some thirty-seven weeks. Not bad for an album that took little more than three days to record in two different studios over a five month period and that basically contains nothing but twelve bar blues. And yet for me it lacks a certain cohesion and continuity. The group’s heavy work schedule did not allow them much time to be in the studio and the demand for an album release by their ever growing legion of fans dictated to a degree our plans as a record label. I feel certain that we were forced into a situation where we had to put out what we had when we had enough playing time to hand. Perhaps Jeremy Spencer’s solo rendition of the Robert Johnson classic might have been replaced with an alternative title. The inclusion of ‘Long Grey Mare’ with bassist Bob Brunning on an album where all other titles feature regular bass man John McVie seem somewhat inappropriate. It would appear that other titles were in fact recorded during the November and December ‘67 sessions but for one reason or another they were not chosen for release at the time. Many of those songs did appear subsequently on ‘The Original Fleetwood Mac’ album (see CD 6) following the band’s departure to Immediate and then Reprise. Putting my own personal feelings to one side however there can be no doubt that Fleetwood Mac’s debut album pleased their hungry fans and it has, over the years, become something of a bench mark for British blues along with the ‘Beano’ album featuring Eric Clapton with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. And now you have the added excitement of further previously unissued titles and alternate takes to whet your appetite.

Seven of the original titles included on ‘Fleetwood Mac’ (Blue Horizon 7-63200) have survived in multi track form. To once again view these tape boxes with the hand written legends courtesy of yours truly and engineer Mike Ross was a strange sensation. A bit like meeting a long lost friend after thirty years I guess. The tapes themselves have survived storage remarkably well and when laced up on the Soundcraft tape machine they played without problems. No creases; no dropouts; no shedding of oxide - sensational! And the sonic picture was as clear as it ever was. Every effort was made to ensure that any and all re-mixes of previously released or unreleased material would match those that had appeared on the original vinyl issue. Of course the discovery of a number of hitherto unlisted titles was a major cause for celebration. Imagine my surprise though when listening to Jeremy’s rendition of ‘Hellhound On My Trail’ in discovering his admission that he didn’t know the words. Should have been obvious really as he delivers the lyrics incorrectly when singing: ‘If today was Christmas Day and tomorrow was Christmas Eve’ - and yet nobody spotted the error at the time and if they did, they kept very quiet. But that’s not the end to this particular tale. Take 2 of ‘Hellhound’ starts out with a similar piano introduction but is followed by a string of verses that are totally different and seemingly unidentifiable as any known copyright already previously recorded. And so was ‘You’re So Evil’ born. The other previously unlisted title ‘I’m Coming Home To Stay’ appeared on a reel of masters sent to me at the last moment from the Sony vaults at Aylesbury. No notation as to the recording date or original source but it would certainly appear to be from an early Mac session. This cut also features piano - probably overdubbed by Jeremy as it’s certainly not Christine Perfect, the only other pianist to record with the band at this time. That only leaves the alternative takes and studio banter.

The barrage of assorted guitar intros that precede ‘My Heart Beat Like A Hammer’ only serves to illustrate the dubious gamesmanship employed by some musicians to upset the producer in times of stress. The cacophony commences with any variation on a Delta theme you care to mention and then quickly develops into various rock riffs including something akin to a Jimi Hendrix tune. My irritation at the insistence of both guitarists to make this unholy racket is indicated by the tapping of my finger many times on the talk back microphone in a vain attempt to get them to pay attention, stop wasting time and record the song of the moment. Eventually they relent and turn to matters in hand. In truth if there was angst then usually I was the one to break first. Neither Peter nor Jeremy (in particular) would miss the opportunaity to wind me up and quite often they succeeded in their quest. Never any ill feelings however - all in good fun. Much of the youthful foolery that you will hear throughout this Box Set is indeed quite amusing even when witnessed by listeners who were not at the scene of the crime, so to speak. But I don’t think any of the band members fully understood the restrictions and therefore the pressures that were being applied to the label and its staff by CBS.

The arrangement we had with our distributor allowed us studio time at a reduced rate but all costs were to be recouped from royalties. In essence, time spent equated to money spent. As already noted the band had little time in their schedule for recording activities and so it was essential to get as much on tape as possible when we did finally get them into the studio. If we fell behind the clock then I was the one who felt the pressue first. That’s part of a producer’s remit. No one in the band paid much attention to the time or to the cost factors however. Not exactly an unknown complaint amongst musicians the world over I might add. I would push the lads forward as best I could but understandably there were times when it seemed more appropriate to them to be having fun and merely enjoying the experience of seeing me get flustered and frustrated. Youthful enthusiasm is a wonderful thing but only when carefully guided I was once told. Amyway, be that as it may, more good fun is to be heard at the onset of the classic ‘Shake Your Moneymaker’. Now, how many of those people who bought the vinyl album and subsequent re-issues in other formats have listened on headphones and wondered why Jeremy is giggling like a schoolboy during the guitar intro. Listen to the complete and unexpurgated version contained here and you’ll have the answer. Also note my slate whilst the Laughing Policeman gag is in full swing: “’Shake Your Moneymaker’ remake Take 1”. A further insight into the world of studio recording can be witnessed at the onset of take 1 of ‘My Heart Beat Like A Hammer’ (originally slated as ‘Don’t Dog Your Woman’) when Jeremy expresses concern regarding his guitar amplifier buzzing and cutting out.

In the case of Peter’s ‘I Loved Another Woman’ and Jeremy’s ‘Cold Black Night” we get the chance to hear how a performance is honed to the point where the master take is achieved. Wrong lyrics; poor pitching; sloppy intros and such can instantly bring the take to a halt. Takes 1 through 4 of ‘I Loved Another Woman’ all have such faults. Despite an aborted attempt at a take 6 the chosen master proved to be number 5 - complete with rooster impersonations to boot. ‘Cold Black Night’ only has as many slates courtesy of Mick Fleetwood’s apparent inability to find the right moment to hit the intro accents. After much chastisement and confused advice he finally makes contact and the deed is done.

If i were to be pressed into making a final judgement on this album it would be to state that it fulfilled the requirements made of it. As a clear and concise representation of what the early Fleetwood Mac was all about however it was more like a book of short stories than a novel. Of course one could always say that the variety to be found made for good listening. I cannot argue that point either. It could have been even better though given more time.

CHAPTER TWO

CD 2 Mr. Wonderful

In this day and age it can sometime be fully eighteen months to two years between the release of an artists’ current CD release and the subsequent follow-up. If the earlier release should chart then the care afforded the new production knows no bounds. Neither the cost factor. But in those heady days of the late 1960s things were a little different. As if to celebrate the releasse of Mac’s debut album during the last week of February 1968, the band headed back into the studio to cut two titles for a new single. ‘Black Magic Woman’ and the coupling ‘The Sun Is Shining’ would be the result of that visit. Within four weeks we were back in the New Bond Street studio yet again, this time looking to record enough material for their second album and indeed, to attempt to cut a version of Little Willie John’s blues ballad ‘Need Your Love So Bad’ for a future single release. But more of that later.

To a degree the band’s first album only partly emulated the energy surges of their stage performances. This was most apparent in Jerry’s boisterous renditions of Shaky Jake’s ‘Shake Your Moneymaker’; Homesick James Williamson’s ‘Got To Move’ and the self-penned ‘My Heart Beat Like A Hammer’. Peter however chose to feature his harmonica work almost as much as he did his guitar wizardry. There was to be something of a change come April ‘68. The plan was to aim for a dirtier, gustier sound - close to that generated at a club performance. After several discussions with the band and engineer Mike Ross we hit upon the idea of hauling the P.A. system into the studio with a view to treating the recording sessions as if it was exactly such a performance. I personally had had several successful experiences whist working at Decca with recording bands in situ - ‘Undead’ by Ten Years After having been the most notable. So why not transfer one of the main club elements into the studio - the dreaded Public Address system!

We did our best to set the band up as if they were on a stage but we also had to consider that it would be necessary for everyone to be able to have eye contact with the two singers. A decision was also take to employ a small horn section as well as Chicken Shack pianist Christine Perfect. Now anyone who has had any experience of studio work will know that when you have more than four or five musicians playing in the studio all at one time you are inevitably going to have what is commonly known in the trade as ‘mike spillage’. Also introduce the element of a P.A. system and you have a recipe for mayhem and potential disaster. With the use of wodden baffles and partitions and some careful manoeuvring of the grade piano (complete with canvas cover) we were able to finally reach a compromise on a suitable working position for each musician. They were able in this way to interact with each other and thus retain some cohesion when playing at full bore. Believe me it took a while to pull that one together!

Exhaustive searches of the vaults unearthed but one multi-track tape from these sessions. A real let down. To have the opportunity of hearing the in-between-takes chatter would have been fascinating. But it was not to be. The one that does exist shows a recording date of 28th April 1968 and the box legend lists two titles: ‘Stop Messin’ Round’ and the remake of ‘Need Your Love So Bad’. It seems unlikely that all the cuts on ‘Mr. Wonderful’ could have been recorded on that same day but in a recent conversation with saxophonist Steve Gregory he was absolutely convinced that all the tracks were cut at one time. Engineer Mike Ross and I however feel that two days would have been the more likely scenario - one for Jeremy’s material and another for Peter.

Taking Jeremy’s performances first it would appear from aural evidence that the piano featured on those titles is in fact played by Jeremy himself. His style is quite different from that of Christine Perfect who most certainly appears on Peter’s songs. As can be heard from his keyboard work on ‘Hellhound On My TrailJerry’s style is rudimentary but effective. Christine did not employ the downward glissando effect used to great effect by the likes of Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis or Johnnie Johnson and there’s plenty of that action to be heard on Jeremy’s numbers as included here. It would also appear that we have doctored the sound somewhat to simulate an upright - although why we would have done this is not clear. You can draw your own conclusions. Mike Ross recalls that Jeremy had specifically requested a much tougher sound than we had achieved for him on earlier dates. We used more of the P.A. system in the mix to roughen up the vocal sound. The old fashioned upright rock and roll approach to recording the piano may well have been at his insistence. Whatever the reason it sits perfectly in the blend so I guess the where-for and the why-for don’t matter that much. It would also appear as though there is no second guitar on these titles - a role usually filled by Peter. An interesting development was it not? The keyboard and horns fill in the spaces. Four horn players are listed on the original vinyl sleeve and here we get into a whole mess of confusion. Aural evidence says that only two are present on Jeremy’s songs. But which two? If I were to hazard a guess it would be to pick Dave Howard and Roland Vaughan. Steve Gregory commented to me that only he and Johnny Almond were on the date(s) and that the names of Howard and Vaughan were - and still are - unknown to him. Engineer Mike Ross however is adamant that the horn section numbered at least four. ‘I remember setting them up in a straight line right behind the piano’ he commented. I further compound the confusion by stating in my liner notes to the CD re-issue on the French Mr. Collector (Sony) label that, and I quote: ‘The Amboy Dukes horn section plus two were added to ‘beef’ up the overall sound.’ Steve was, at the time, a member of the Amboy Dukes but Almond was working with Zoot Money. The aural evidence in relation to Peter’s songs certainly gives the impression of more than two horns but it’s never easy to identify indivuduals when they’re playing in a section and even tougher if they are doubling the same part in unison. So - if messrs. Howard and Vaughan do indeed exist, make yourselves known gentlemen!

In any event there is a full density of sound on these titles that is most certainly not apparent on the ‘Fleetwood Mac’ album. There can be no doubt that this is a direct result of having recorded the full band and guest musicians as one unit. No overdubs - excepted where noted above. If someone made a mistake that could not be covered then we simply cut the song again. Most of the material contained here was written especially for the project and many of them had been performed at one time or another in front of an audience but never with horns. The parts would have been worked out as head arrangements on the session guided by Peter, Jeremy or myself. In no way do the sections sound out of place and indeed they add much to the proceedings.

The mournful Otis Rush inspired minor blues ‘Love That Burns’ in particular benefits from their presence and throughout the sessions the subdued piano work from Chicken Shack’s Christine Perfect is exemplary. We also get the opportunity to hear Tony ‘Duster’ Bennett duet with Peter Green. The one-man band from Ham, Richmond in Surrey was to be represented with several album and single releases during his recording activities with Blue Horizon. At a later date Peter was to return the favour by appearing on Duster’s ‘Bright Lights Big City’ album when he played bass under the pseudonym of Peter Blue.

A further bonus is offered in the form of the two previously unlisted titles ‘I Held My Baby Last Night’ and ‘Mystery Boogie’ featuring the Lichfield slider. Both these titles were part of the same reel that of stereo masters that as if manna from heaven and as mentioned in Chapter One.

I cannot for the life of me recall these two cuts and although they must have been recorded during the band’s contractual life with CBS they have proven difficult to place chronologically. Horns are again present; the vocal is set back in reverb and the drums take a central position but in the background. The most interesting talking point is that of the identity of the bass player. It certainly isn’t John McVie who to the best of my memory never played with a pick and the playing is not that assured. There are two possible scenarios then. Firstly, the mystery man is Bob Brunning. Again I think this is unlikely bearing in mind my last comment and Bob has never made mention of recording any such titles with the band. Secondly, that it is either Jeremy or Peter. My money’s on the latter.

Mr. Wonderful’ was finally released in September 1968 but did not achieve quite the chart success we had all hoped for. It still did very good business though and better than many might have thought possible. There were many non-believers who were just waiting for the so-called ‘blues boom’ bubble to burst. Thankfully they would have to wait a little longer for that event to come around.

As a final closing comment to this Chapter we should not forget the sterling work done on our behalf by photographer and designer Terence Ibbott. Choosing the final shot for the double gatefold sleeve proved difficult especially when the band were pushing for the infamous ‘udder’ shot - now to be seen in all it’s dubious glory in Mick Fleetwood’s “25 Years in Fleetwood Mac” publication. Well, at least no one would ignore our releases as a result of boring artwork that’s for sure!

CHAPTER THREE

CD 3 The Pious Bird Of Good Omen

In it’s original vinyl form this collection was issued August 1969 in an attempt to pre-empt the then imminent release of the Reprise album ‘Then Play On’. With the huge success of ‘Man Of The World’ - originally planned as the Blue Horizon follow-up to the Number One hit ‘Albatross’ but ending up seeing the light of day via Immediate - it was deemed sensible by CBS to cash-in on that success and re-market ‘Need Your Love So Bad’. That play only partly succeeded as the re-release was to touch #32 on the singles chart whereas the original had climbed one notch further. But ‘The Pious Bird Of Good Omen’ (Blue Horizon 7-63215) did hit the album charts in August and eventually climbed to #18. ‘Then Play On’ was to follow but two months later.

In essence ‘Pious Bird’ was made up of four single releases, two album tracks and two further titles that featured Fleetwood Mac in a backing role behind Chicagoan blue pianist/vocalist Eddie Boyd. ‘Just The Blues’ taken from Boyd’s Blue Horizon album ‘7936 South Rhodes’ (7-63202) with the additional single title ‘The Big Boat’ (57-3137) are not included on this CD but are currently to be found on various re-issues in the digital domain. The band’s first release coupled ‘I Believe My Time Ain’t Long” with the second studio version of ‘Rambling Pony’ and was marketed on the CBS label prior to the full fledged Blue Horizon mark being launched in January of 1968. Once again the multi-tracks surfaced and I took the opportunity to re-mix both cuts so as to be able to include in this CD what little studio banter was caught on oxide at the time and hopefully offer a better sonic picture. What is revealing is that ‘Rambling Pony’ was quite obviously layered. It would appear that bass drum and harminoca were laid to tape at the same time as both continue long after guitar and vocal tracks have given up the ghost. Mick’s bass drum beat plays even crotchets through eight bars and Peter attempts to start in on his harmonica riff at the onset of the fifth bar, fails and retires with more success at the commencement of bar eight. Six of those eight bars would be removed with the aide of a razor blade prior to mastering for the resultant single release. There would appear to be four or five voices backing Peter’s vocal in ‘chain gang’ style and it would be safe to assume that they included the band members along with the producer. Never miss the chance to be in there if you can help it is my motto.

The second single ‘Black Magic Woman’ (57-3138) coupled with Jeremy’s cover of Elmore James’ ‘The Sun Is Shining’ faired much better as far as media attention was concerned and gave the label its first singles chart placing (#37 on 10th April 1968). For me the Peter Green penned ‘Black Magic Woman’ represents a high spot in the band’s early recording career showing the leader at his best both as guitarist and vocalist. It’s no wonder that Carlos Santana covered it several years later and to such good effect that many people have long forgotten that it started life in New Bond Street. Now I’m sure it can only be coincidence but note Peter’s closing line as the title fades: ‘Oh I need your love so bad’ - how convenient.

The very first attempt to record the Little Willie John classic was made on 11th April 1968. Once again we got lucky in the multi-track department and that good fortune is now passed on to you. It will be apparent that there was a lack of pre-production for the aforementioned session date and that an air of ‘laissez fair’ pervaded the proceedings. Peter would appear to have been the only member of the band fully conversant with the chord structure as both McVie and Christine Perfect - playing piano on this version - get lost or falter on a number of occasions. The rising scale at the close of the completed take totally throws Christine. The arrangement is also extended as a result of a double guitar solo prior to the bridge which likeise becomes yet another solo instead of the planned vocal sequence. Said triple solo never appeared on any other studio versions that were to follow - thankfully. A second attempt was made to cut this title two weeks later with much better results. The piano was replaced with Hammond B3 and there was a much more positive feel to proceedings. In all four complete takes were commited to tape and again, all have survivied on multi-track and here they are. No apologies for their inclusion either as they serve in the total to illustrate admirably how to get the very best out of the recording progress. With one take and then another you can almost feel the song breathing and taking on a life of it’s own. The light and shade variations (diminuendos and crescendos in musical terminology) between takes 1 and 3 are quite noticeable despite the absence of sax player Steve Gregory subsequent to take 1. The fourth version is agreed upon as the best and that becomes the master to which horns and strings are later added. And therein lies a further tale.

Amongst the musicians that played on the original recording by Willie John way back in 1955 was non other than guitarist Mickey ‘Guitar’ Baker - one half of the R&B hit making duo Mickey & Sylvia. Following many years of successful record making and session work Mickey emigrated to make a new home in Paris, France. I had already had the pleasure of working with him on a Champion Jack Dupree project for Decca but a year earlier. I knew him to be a fine arranger with the ability to write a full orchestral score and so I suggested to Peter that it might be a really neat idea to add strings to this title. At first the idea was greeted with a certain amount of disdain but it wasn’t long before there was a change of heart and I was off to Paris. Mickey was absolutely thrilled at the idea of getting involved and set to work immediately.

Within a couple of weeks we were back in the studio with the full completment of gypsies! Regrettably we were not able to arrange for Mickey to travel to London to conduct and that chore was taken on by trumpet player/arranger Terry Noonan. Although by no means guaranteed it is quite likely that the horns that can be heard were also added at the same time. Steve Gregory does not recall ever playing on this track and certainly not with a string section in tow and it would therefore seem likely that Terry wrote new horn charts based upon Steve’s original lines and now unidentifiable players did as was required of them. With the overdubs complete it was the general consensus of opinion that we had a potential hit on our hands but at six minutes it would either require and edit or a fade. We plumped for the latter offering up the idea of putting the remainder of the song out as the flip side. That plan was dropped in favour of including an alternative take of ‘Stop Messin’ Round’ but now for the first time ever you get to hear the full version. At the request of Seymour Stein of Sire NY a further session was arranged in October of that year to enable Peter to overdub new guitar and vocal parts for a US single release. The results were shelved and have never been heard until now. Incidentally, the original Blue Horizon single (57-3139) hit the #31 spot on 17th July 1968.

The Pious Bird Of Good Omen - plain old ‘Albatross’ to the lay person - was conceived by Peter and then adapted by John and Mick. It may well have been loosely based upon the recording ‘Sleepwalk’ as recorded by Santo & Johnny back in the late fifties. This dreamy almost soporific instrumental was to mark the label’s most successful moment when in early 1969 it reached the #1 spot following its first entry to the charts on 4th December 1968. As I mentioned in the booklet that is part of ‘The Blue Horizon Story 1965-1970 Vol.1’ 3 CD Box Set radio airplay was hard to come by - even for a band with two chart successes to their name. The CBS and Blue Horizon promo teams tried without success to get a spot on Top Of The Pops. An unexpected appearance on a Saturday evening TV show hosted by Simon Dee gave us the chance we had been waiting for. The response was almost immediate and within a matter of a few months ‘Albatross’ (57-3145) coupled with ‘Jigsaw Puzzle Blues’ (which featured new guitarist Danny Kirwan) had sold in excess of one million copies. CBS were later to re-issue this title in 1973 and its success was to be repeated, reaching as it did, the #2 spot and selling all but ninety thousand short of the million mark on that second time around.

The young Danny Kirwan, ex-leader of the blue trio billed as The Boilerhouse, joined Fleetwood Mac in the summer of 1968. Danny proved to be a talented writer and no mean singer and guitarist who was to make substantial contributions to the band’s musical output in the years to come. Much of his studio work is featured on CD 6 of this Box Set but one title that appears to have escaped the net until now is the original version of ‘Like Crying’. The version included here and the one that appeared on ‘Then Play On’ are indeed very similar but there are moments when they are noticeably not so. The difference in the quality of recording is also quite marked although one would assume that those in charge of production on the Reprise label would have had the benefit of working with a multi-track whereas we were only offered a fait accompli stereo recording complete with faded intro. Better than nothing though. The legend of the tape box incidentally lists the title as ‘Woman’s Got The Blues’.

Considered by many to have not been a legitimate Fleetwood Mac album it nevertheless created quite a demand. It also drew a fair amount of attention featuring as it does a nun looking close to nine months pregnant. She is also carrying a stuffed Albatross. Now I wonder which one of the Monty Python team is a Fleetwood Mac aficionado?

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5/5.05/5.05/5.05/5.05/5.0
The perfect box for Fleetwood Mac blues period lovers
Review written by Mats, November 11th, 2004

What more is there to say? Do you enjoy the old blues Fleetwood Mac albums with Peter Green? This is it! If you do not have them on vinyl that is. Good sound quality CD's. Nice bonus tracks. Good booklet.

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Rest Of Liner Notes:

CHAPTER FOUR

CD 4 Blues Jam In Chicago - Volume One

There can be little doubt that of all the albums recorded and/or released on the CBS/Blue Horizon labels the double ‘Blues Jam At Chess’ was the least successful commercially and the most ignored by Mac fans. Recorded in one day this project threw together the members of the band and a handful of leading Chicago blues men: Buddy Guy, Otis Spann, Walter ‘Shakey’ Horton, David ‘Honey Boy’ Edwards, J.T. Brown and S.P. Leary under the guidence of Willie Dixon. The studio chosen as the venue was the Ter-Mar complex owned by Chess Records.

The idea to record the band in such surroundings had been mooted late in 1968 but the opportunity to follow through did not present itself until the band was booked to undertake a short club tour of the East Coast of the States over the New Year period 1968/9. New York based Blue Horizon partner Seymour Stein put me directly in touch with Marshall Chess. The Chess family had been running their own independent label since the late ‘40s and could boast a roster of artists almost second to none: Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf, Sonny Boy Williamson, Bo Diddley, Etta James, Little Walter - the list was almost unending. It was Marshall who suggested using Willie Dixon as the catalyst for putting together the musicians to participate in the recording sessions that would eventually take place on 4th January 1969. Regrettably many of the really famous names were not available at that time. They were either on the road or returning to the Windy City following the Christmas/New Year holidy period. Then again they might have been suspicious of being involved in any project where the use of their name might cause conflict with their various record labels. Imagine my disappointment also when I was told at a later date that I couldn’t even use Buddy Guy’s name even though the sessions had been co-produced by a member of the Chess family and cut in their own studio! Guy was instantly transfermed into Guitar Buddy.

Plans were set in motion despite the fact there was initially an air of indifference wafting in from the general direction of certain band members. Peter and Jeremy however seemed genuinely excited about the event. Peter had been a fan of Otis Spann for some time and mainly as a result of having heard his work with half-brother Muddy Waters. In fact the band was to find itself in the studio again with Spann inside of a week - this time in New York with the album ‘The Biggest Thing Since Colossus’ (Blue Horizon 7-63217) being the result. Meanwhile Jeremy was acting as if he’d won the pools as he began to relish the up-coming opportunity of recording with J.T. Brown who for many years had worked and recorded with his idol and main influence, Elmore James. The other three members gradually began to warm to the idea of the project and when the time finally came to take care of business they gave their all.

Memories of that day are still quite vivid although I have to be honest and say that I still cannot believe that we achieved so much in but one day. I often ask myself as to whether we might not have actually taken two. I’ve even written to that effect but in truth I don’t recall. We hardly ever did more than one take of any song so I guess the project could have been completed in the one day. In any event I don’t remember there being much sense of urgency although as the clock wound down I did push Peter and the lads to try and get a couple of other tunes in the bag before time ran out on us. Democracy reigned throughout and when the decision was finally taken what to record next and who would feature everyone jumped in and got on with it. Roll the tape and push the record button was the order of the day.

Sad to say then that only two reels of the original multi-track tapes still exist and they offered up only one item that had not appeared on the original double pakaging. We did however discover two and half reels of stereo out-takes amongst which we found a second version of ‘Red Hot Jam’; a cover of Elmore James’ instrumental ‘Bobby’s Rock’; various Walter Horton items along with two featuring David Edwards; an incomplete take of ‘Sugar Mama’ and plenty of good studio chat. But Otis Spann’s version of ‘Ain’t Nobody’s Business’ would appear to have vanished. The box legends that survive would appear to indicate that the order of the song which were recorded coincides with the running order that appears on the vinyl albums. I took the decision however to close the sequence of Jeremy’s four tracks on this CD by adding the hitherto unreleased ‘Bobby’s Rock’. It may well be that in fact this title was recoreded later in the day but so long after the event it is impossible to say. Take 1 of ‘Red Hot Jam’ is something of a ramshackle affair but it does clearly illustate the rather haphazard way in which these sessions were conducted. Willie Dixon, Buddy Guy, Peter and yours truly discuss who’s going to play what, where and when whilst Walter Horton lurks in the background itching to get on with it. And check out Willie’s comments at the close of the performance where he berates Horton for ending when nobody had given him the cue to do so - classic moments. More such chastisement befalls the luckless Horton preceding ‘I Need Your Love’ - this time S.P. Leary delivers the tongue lashing. Seemingly unaware of what was going on around him, Walter ignores all and goes for it! Finally he takes a deep breath and decorum is restored. Mind you it doesn’t last long as take 1 of the hitherto unreleased ‘Horton’s Boogie Woogie’ and the false start of ‘I Got The Blues’ clearly demonstrate.

If I had to do this over again for sure I would not have allowed Buddy Guy to leave so early in the proceedings. He is only present on ‘Red Hot Jam’ and I cannot help feeling that if he had stayed we could have enticed him to play much more. He made his excuses however and left for a prior engagement. You win some and lose some.

CHAPTER FIVE

CD 5 Blues Jam In Chicago - Volume Two

The contributions made by the comparitively new boy Danny Kirwan to the Chess Studio sessions are to my way of thinking some of the most enjoyable. His re-workig of the Jimmy Rogers Cold War inspired ‘The World’s In A Tangle’ might be considered to be something of an odd choice in view of the lyrical content but it stands up well. Danny’s two self-penned tracks show his writing talents to the best advantage and the duo guitar melody and call and response work is as good as it gets - especially on ‘Like It This Way’. There’s a real fire about this performance that makes it one of my favourites of this set. That’s a tought call though when the next sequence of tracks features the inimitable Otis Spann. Those smoky, lived-in vocals and superb keyboard work never cease to thrill: for Spann was a master of his trade. The piano genius built up a very strong relationship with Fleetwood Mac and in particular with Messrs. Green and Kirwan. I remember him attending a performance of the band in Chicago (or was it New York) and being genuinely impressed with Peter’s guitar work. ‘Man he plays like B.B. Sure sounds like he knows the blues’ - were his comments at the time or words to that effect. In some small way we tried to give Spann a helping hand when we cut ‘The Biggest Thing Since Colossus’ - accompanied by Peter, Danny, John and drummer S.P. Leary deputising for Mick. Those sessions feature some outstanding guitar work from both guitarists and will be a part of a further re-issue programme of Blue Horizon material to see the light of day in the months to come. Otis Spann made many fine recordings in his career both as accompanist and featured performer and indeed, precious few would not be worth having in your collection. His untimely death in 1970 was a very sad loss to all real blues fans and in particular to those whose penchant was for piano blues. His like may never be heard again.

The highlight of Jeremy’s second set (as it were) must surely be J.T. Brown’s reworking of his own twice before recorded ‘Black Jack Blues’. Now if you listen very closely during the first vocal verse you will hear Willie Dixon tell ‘Honey Boy’ to ‘lay out now’. One can only assume this request to have been a result of the highly suspect tuning of his guitar. Mind you if one was to be perfectly honest some of Willie’s own tuning leaves a little to be desired - this more to do with fingering though. John T. then observes at the end of this only take that the key was too low and he might have to raise it. He does not get his wish though as Jeremy takes over to deliver his version of Memphis Slim’s ‘Everyday I Have The Blues’ and a rousing ‘Rockin’ Boogie’. David ‘Honey Boy’ Edwards is once again back in the frame and now a little more in tune. As noted earlier ‘Bobby’s Rock’ probably comes from this sequence of the original sessions and for similar aural reasons it might be safe to assume that the two items featuring Edwards likewise come from that same time frame. The notes for ‘The Blue Horizon Story 1965-1970 Vol. 1’ however make mention that Buddy Guy was in attendance on the previously unreleased ‘My Baby’s Gone’ putting it into an earlier time slot. Unfortunately there is no written record of this sequence of events so you can best judge for yourselves as to whom is actually present. At the best of times David can be a little on the erratic side and his performances here prove to be no exception to the rule. The vocal however is really strong and he manages on several occasions to jump into the falsetto range quite confortably - a style much loved and practiced by the now legendary Robert Johnson, a one time travelling companion of Edwards. The instrumental - given the title ‘Honey Boy Blues’ for this first ever release - was caught at the start of the reel and thus its incompleteness. The same is also true of the initial version of ‘Sugar Mama’ when Peter makes comment of my apparent inability to record the good stuff and jokingly (I hope) blames my ‘bum producing’. Yet more amusing moments follow when Peter and Jeremy discuss the time that the latter was caught singing about ‘old Spencer’s sinking down’. The master of ‘Sugar Mama’ (take 3) is hardly faultless and it can only be because of the pressue of time that we did not cut it again. In a last ditched effort to squeeze out one more song Peter chose ‘Homework’ (originally recorded by Otis Rush) and stumps were drawn.

The closing sequence of ‘Blues Jam At Chess - Volume Two’ features those titles by Walter Horton that were deemed unusable for inclusion on the original release. One listen should tell you why. Walter was not the most organised of musicians. He was prone to singing one verse into the vocal mike and the next into the harp mike or moving without warning from one to the other in mid-sentence. Then he might not use either for the next sequence. He hardly ever counted off an intro so all the other musicians would have to find their own way in when they could. He would never cue stops, accents nor an end. Everybody just had to do their best to keep up with him. And he never stopped to ask as to whether what had been recorded was usable or not - on to the next song almost without a pause. I had found it difficult build any rapport with Walter and that didn’t help matters. He was never able to remember my name always referring to Stu Black if he had anything to say. Never mind. There are one or two very good moments but in general these performances lack cohesion in most departments.

As a further insight into the problems of personality clashes in the studio you will note the comments that pass yet again between Walter and S.P. at the onset of ‘Rock Me Baby’. Ever wanted to be a fly on the wall?

Whatever the resultant lack of commercial rewards earned from this double pack the Chicago sessions were in their own way a landmark, for they represent the last occasion that Fleetwood Mac would record any straight ahead blues material. The record date held one week later in New York with Otis Spann did not include either Jeremy Spencer or Mick Fleetwood. Almost immediately following those sessions more time was booked at Tempo Sound and the beginnings of ‘Man Of The World’ were laid to tape. You will need to look elsewhere to read how that story went.

CHAPTER SIX

CD 6 The Original Fleetwood Mac

The year 1992 saw the first printing of a fascinating book compiled by researcher Leslie Fancourt, documenting the complete history of the Blue Horizon label, release by release and session by session.

Much of the information contained in that excellent publication was not too difficult to come by but some elements appeared in their supposed chronilogical position more as a result of aural guesswork than confirmed written evidence. One of the more confused sections covers those songs that made up the CBS release ‘The Original Fleetwood Mac’. which appeared on the shelves of most self-respecting record stores during November 1971.

The album comprised previously unissued material that for one reason or another had been thought of as not worthy of release at the time. Strange how one’s opinions can change over a period of time for there’s little here that would have you rushing back to your local store for a refund. We have been able to add quite a number of extra bits and pieces in the way of alternative versions, false starts and re-mixes. There is also the added bonus of another previosly unreleased track - Danny Kirwan’s ‘Coming Your Way’ - which in a re-recorded form would become the opening cut to their ‘Then Play On’ album. Two of the tunes recorded at Decca’s West Hampstead studios in 1967 resurfaced in the guise of the instrumental ‘Fleetwood Mac’ and the slow ‘First Train Home’. So too did the other version of ‘Rambling Pony’ which was given the additional ‘No. 2’ tag indicating only that it was the second released version and not necessarily the second recorded version. You can take that from the horse’s mouth as I was the one to add that very tag. The two variations on a theme are substantially different and that due in the main to the addition of bass and washboard as heard on this CD. All other titles contained here were recorded at the CBS Studio in New Bond Street although I have queried in my own mind the location for ‘Drifting’. The drum sound says Decca No. 2 to my ears but once again I have no written proof so my observation on that matter is open for discussion. In any event it would appear that Peter laid the rhythm guitar part with John and Mick and then overdubbed the vocal and solo phrases. There is an excellent pre-master take of ‘Watch Out’ which inexplicably comes to a half prompting Peter to make comment that he didn’t realize we were recording at the time. Even in more recent times Peter has made the same observations and in particular citing the instrumental ‘Greeny’ (recorded for Decca as The Bluesbreakers) which he has always maintained was nothing more than a jam. I’m only glad that we were in record at the time! Further problems of a musican nature raise their head as both Mick and John have difficulty in finding their starting points for ‘Leaving Town Blues’ and ‘A Fool No More’. John’s vocal chords get a first ever airing on disc as he apologises for making the same mistake over and over again on the latter title. Peter then gets antsy with me as I stop take 6 despite the fact that John again jumps in to claim his rightful place as the culprit. Peter tries to calm John by laying the blame on the producer (that’s what we’re there for isn’t it?) and finally John dutifully requests the opportunity to rehearse his part before a further take is committed to tape. Finally it’s in the bag but as all but the deaf will be witness, John still doesn’t nail his part. Now who was it who said that perfection wasn’t a prerequisite for playing the blues?

On a slightly more humorous note we have salvaged the studio chat and incomplete rehearsal of ‘Worried dream’. I slate the tape following that run through as take 1; Mike Ross then slates it immediately as take 2 to which Peter swiftly responds with a childlike: ‘take 3’. Mike Ross then comments over the intercom that the tape is rolling to which Peter retorts: ‘Rollin’? What do you think this is - a stagecoach?’ As if totally transposed from one mood to another he then launches almost immediately into the first line of the opening verse: ‘Well I feel so bad - I wonder what’s wrong with me?’ Honest - no edits - just as you hear it.

Slide guitar wizard Jeremy and third guitarist Danny Kirwan are featured on four cuts apiece. Two of Jerry’s pieces are solo whist his rendition of Homesick James Williamson’s ‘Can’t Afford To Do It’ must surely have been cut at the same session as ‘Shake Your Moneymaker’. This was probably passed over in preference to the latter when the titles for the album ‘Fleetwood Mac’ were picked. The alternative mix versions of ‘Allow Me One More Show’, ‘Mean Old Fireman’ and ‘Love That Woman’ appear on that rogue two track tape of which there was mention in Chapter One. Three of the four songs featuring Danny were actually released in the US on an Epic album entitled ‘English Rose’ which was adorned with one of the most frightening shots ever taken by photographer Terence Ibbott of Mick Fleetwood.

As a general rule any collection album that is in the main made up of previously rejected titles is viewed with a certain amount of suspicion by the press and buyer alike. There was always much to commend the original vinyl release of ‘The Original Fleetwood Mac’. The addition of several alternative takes along with the rediscovered earlier recording of ‘Coming Your Way’ (listed as ‘Going My Way’ on the tape box by the way) only help to enhance the enjoyment of this CD 6.

You can now go back to CD 1 and feel that you have completed the full circle.

Afterword

Much has been written about the history of Fleetwood Mac and its various prominent members. All make for informative and entertaining reading but two publications in particular stand out as being most memorable. Mick Fleetwood’s pictoral history of the band (published by Weidenfield & Nicolson) should be considered as a must for any real Mac fan. Much of the early photographic material used in that book had been taken by the indefatigable Terence Ibbott, and I spent many hours during the course of writing these notes and compiling the Box Set attempting to track his current whereabouts. I never actually thought to check in the telephone directory, but when I did - what did I find but a sole entry for the very man himself. We talked for as much time as circumstances would allow and it was sad to learn that his entire photo library had gone up in smoke some years earlier during a major fire at his London home. Terence gave me the distinct impression that he had on file hundreds of prints and negatives, not only of Fleetwood Mac but also of many of the other acts that had signed to Blue Horizon. A truly sad loss. “Jet” Martin Celminsbiography of Peter Green (published by Sanctuary Publishing) is also worth searching out. That book covers the same period in time as dealt with in this CD re-issue, and gives a far deeper insight into the development of the band than I have been able to do. The synopsis (or part of it) that appears on the cover of that book says it all, and I quote: ‘Peter Green is an enigma. Early stardom as guitar hero and founder of Fleetwood Mac has brought him permanent fame. Master of both country and urban blues at twenty-one, this Jewish cockney went on to write pop hits that over the years have proved timeless. Yet, in the 1970s he gave it all up. Just like that. “Peter Green: Founder of Fleetwood Mac - The Biography’ for the first time gets to grips with the personal trauma and creative tensions on the road, backstage and in studios which underpinned Peter Green and Fleetwood Mac’s rise to the top.’

It would be a lie if I said that working with Fleetwood Mac in the studio was problem free. Whilst there were certainly many moments of a humorous nature that will forever stay in my memory, there were also times where I could have gladly strangled any one of them. They probably felt the same way about me too. But tensions can, in their own way, throw people together and there should be no doubt whatever that collectively we produced some damn fine music during the two years that they were signed to Blue Horizon. The reason for the subsequent move to Immediate and thence Reprise has remained a source of some embarrassment, but that’s life. Naturally I would have wished to carry on the relationship we had been building but other factors had found their way into the equation, and it was not to be.

It would be difficult to quantify the exact number of man-hours that went into the production of this 6 CD Box Set but suffice it to say however long that period in time might prove to be it was worth the effort. Litterally no stone was left unturned in the seeming never-ending search for unreleased material. In the final event two titles have eluded me and are presumed destroyed: Otis Spann’s Ter-Mar version of ‘Ain’t Nobody’s Business’ and ‘Can’t Stop Loving My Baby’ which, though listed as present on the tape box, is not present in reality. One would assume this to be a cover of the Elmore James song featuring Jeremy Spencer.

Every care was taken in the re-mixing process as well as at the final editing and compilation stages. Frankly I don’t know what else could have been done to make this any more agreeable to the buyer and listener.

It is to be hoped that you will gain as much pleasure from listening to what’s on offer as I have in putting it together. If a job is worth doing then it should be done properly, or not at all. I don’t believe that you will have reason to be disappointed.

Mike Vernon, April 1999

Acknowledgements

To the good people at Sony Music Entertainment (UK) Ltd. in London - Phil Savil, Hugh Attwooll and Sara Fecamp and to the equally good people at The Sire Record Group in New York and London - Seymour Stein, Barry Feldman, Lyle Preslar, and Geraldine Oakley. Further thanks to the following for their hard work and concientiousness in aiding and abetting the programme when asked to do so: Richard Bowe and Steve Walsh in the Archives Department at Sony Music Operations, Aylesbury; Rob Keyloch at The Sound Studio in Stoke Newington, London N16 and Duncan Cowell at Sound Mastering in Park Royal, London NW10. Thanks also to the following for their input: Peter Green, Stuart Taylor, Mike Ross; Steve Gregory; Neil Slaven; Leslie Fancourt; Jon Frost; Peter Moody; ‘Jet’ Martin Celmins; Jeff Lowenthal; Terence Ibbott; Alasdair Blazzer and Richard Vernon.

MCPS/BIEM/SDRM

© 1999 Sony Music Entertainment (UK) Ltd.
Sony Music Entertainment (UK) Ltd. are the exclusive licenses for this compilation.
COLUMBIA is the exclusive tradmark of Sony Music Entertainment Inc.
Distribution: Sony Music

Front cover & some booklet photographs: © Jeff Lowenthal/Chicago

Every effort has been made to credit photographers whose work is included in this booklet.

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2011-06-25
    Tracklisting »
Discography entry submitted by Mary Anne.