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    Song Title »
Tango In The Night
    Authors »
Lindsey Buckingham

    Year Written »
1987

    Lyrics »

Listen to the wind on the water
Listen to the waves upon the shore
Try to sleep, sleep won't come
Just as I begin to fade

Then I remember
When the moon was full and bright
I would take you in the darkness
And do the tango in the night
Tango...

I keep the dream in my pocket
Never let it fade away
Inside, outside
No loneliness in this dream

Then I remember
When the moon was full and bright
I would take you in the darkness
And do the tango in the night
Tango...

    Fan Interpretation »

Contributors to this interpretation included: Lisa Wellman, Thom Abeles, Kel, Silver Springs, Erik, Derik, Lauren, Tony, and Ann Sissom.

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In 1987, when Tango In The Night first came out, the press quickly labeled it , as what Rumours was for pain, Tango In The Night was for healing. Buckingham managed to record, in verse, some of his most intimate feelings about love. His passion for guitar playing is once again evident, when he brings this song to closure, with a signature "Lindsey Buckingham" electrifying guitar solo.

Though it is not clear, exactly who this song was written about, the majority of fans speculate it is about former lover, Stevie Nicks. What we do know is that "Tango In The Night" is a vivid memory of a very special relationship, that provided Lindsey with a creative outlet, full of passion and imagery.

The opening chords have an ethereal, dreamy affect to them, as the song starts.

"Listen to the wind on the water
Listen to the waves upon the shore
Try to sleep, sleep won't come
Just as I begin to fade..."

It seems that Lindsey was having a very hard time falling to sleep. One can almost envision a house on the ocean, with beautiful cliffs, a sea swaying softly in the night and Lindsey himself tossing and turning, until finally, the calming sounds of repetitive waves bring him to the edge of sleep.

"Then I remember.."

This line is symbolic, as if dreaming, then waking suddenly. The tone, that the music conveys is very urgent sounding and intense.

"When the moon was full and bright
I would take you in the darkness
And do the tango in the night
Tango..."

Years ago, while being interviewed for a solo project, Lindsey made mention of something very interesting. While talking about a song he wrote called "Slow Dancing" he mentioned that this was his way of saying he wanted to SEE someone, to TOUCH someone and to MAKE LOVE to someone. So, it might be plausible that this dance, the TANGO, may actually have an analogical meaning.

He recalls vividly the moon being full and bright and how he would take this woman, in the darkness and do the tango with her. Perhaps the full moon is in reference to the early tours, Lindsey and Stevie did with Fleetwood Mac, when a huge moon was the bands backdrop at live shows.

"I keep the dream in my pocket
Never let it fade away
Inside, outside
No loneliness in this dream"

These memories that come to Lindsey in his dreams, stay with him at all times. Though he can't control how and when he dreams at night, he can suppress these emotions during the day. It's evident that he keeps the dream very close to him, in his shirt pocket, right beside his heart and firmly believes that no loneliness exists in it. In 1976, Stevie wrote "Dreams" for Lindsey. A song, that seems to be a constant reminder about impending loneliness.

"But listen carefully to the sound
Of your loneliness...
Like a heartbeat drives you mad
In the stillness of remembering...
What you had...." SN (1976)
Nicks wrote of the pain the two dealt with in the song "Dreams" and Buckingham seemingly writes of the memories that have no doubtedly lingered through all these years. Both have openly admitted they are each others soulmates in life and that could very well be the dream and reality, that Lindsey holds on to.

As the last word to this song is sung, the music suddenly stops and the dramatic guitar solo arrives. The chords swell and surge, as if the guitar is trying to tell us it's own point of view, and is actually more haunting than the lyrics and the mysterious woman behind them....whoever she may be.

(The interpretations to these lyrics were compiled through discussions on the message boards of the Penguin, The Ledge. It is entirely possible that the artists had something completely different in mind.)

    Tabs »
If you would like to submit tabs for this song, click here.

    Performances »
Performance #1:
Date Performance 1987-00-00
Running Time 3:56
Sound Clip Listen.
Performers Stevie Nicks (Vocals), Lindsey Buckingham (Vocals), Lindsey Buckingham (Guitar), Christine McVie (Keyboards), Christine McVie (Vocals), Mick Fleetwood (Drums), John McVie (Bass)
Appears On
Tango In The Night (1987)
Fleetwood Mac
Fleetwood Mac: Tango In The Night (1987)
Warner Brothers Publications Inc.
Fleetwood Mac: Anthology Of Classics (1989)
Warner Brothers Publications Inc.
Tango In The Night/Tango In The Night (1987)
Fleetwood Mac

    Comments »

(C) 1987 Now Sound Music (BMI) All Rights Reserved. Used by Permission.

    Reviews »
Add your review of Tango In The Night here.

5/5.05/5.05/5.05/5.05/5.0
Haunting
Review written by Mark, March 16th, 2009

I remember it clearly.. I bought Tango In the Night in 1987. Big love was on the radio at the time, it grabbed my attention initially but it was nothing relative to the rest of the album! Tango in the night is my most favourite track on the album, dark deep and moody with a killer guitar solo by Lindsey. It took me far away instantly conjuring exotic images all the way through. It's so good in fact that the track seems to short and leaves you wanting more but I think that's intentional ( after all that's exactly what happens when you do the tango in the night! ). Next to I'm so scared it's the greatest track ever. Ethereally haunting it was my introduction to Fleetwood Mac and I've been hooked ever since!

    Last Modified »
2009-04-15

    Discography Credits »
Interpretation prepared by Lisa Wellman and Thom Abeles.