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Crossroads (1988) - Eric (Patrick) Clapton


    Featuring »

Duane Allman, Duane Allman, Ginger Baker, Ginger Baker, Blind Faith, Delaney Bramlett, Bonnie Bramlett, Jack Bruce (John Symon Asher), Jack Bruce (John Symon Asher), Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Eric (Patrick) Clapton, Rita Coolidge, Cream, Delaney & Bonnie, Derek And The Dominos, Chris Dreja, Eric Clapton & Duane Allman, Hughie Flint, Jim Gordon, Jim Gordon, Ric(k) Grech, John Mayall & Eric Clapton, John Mayall And The Bluesbreakers, Tex Johnson, Bobby Keys, Dave Mason, Dave Mason, John Mayall, John Mayall, Jim McCarty, John McVie, Jim Price, Carl Radle, Carl Radle, Keith Relf, Paul Samwell-Smith, The Yardbirds, Bobby Whitlock, Bobby Whitlock, Steve Winwood

    Tracklisting »
Disc One:
Boom Boom
  Date Performance: 1963, Running Time: 2:25
  Comments: by The Yardbirds. From THE YARDBIRDS first studio session, recorded late 1963 at R.G. Jones Studio in Surrey, England. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Honey In Your Hips
  Date Performance: 1963, Running Time: 2:18
  Comments: by The Yardbirds. From THE YARDBIRDS first studio session, recorded late 1963 at R.G. Jones Studio in Surrey, England. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Baby What's Wrong
  Date Performance: 1963, Running Time: 2:40
  Comments: by The Yardbirds. From THE YARDBIRDS first studio session, recorded late 1963 at R.G. Jones Studio in Surrey, England. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
I Wish You Would
  Date Performance: 1964-04-00, Running Time: 2:19
  Comments: Recorded at Olympic Studios, March/April 1964. Released July 1964 as the A-side of THE YARDBIRDS' first single. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
A Certain Girl
  Date Performance: 1964-04-00, Running Time: 2:17
  Comments: by The Yardbirds. Recorded at Olympic Studios, March/April 1964. Released July 1964 as the B-side of I WISH YOU WOULD. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
  Date Performance: 1964-08-00, Running Time: 2:45
  Comments: Recorded at Olympic Studios. Released October 1964 as the A-side of THE YARDBIRDS' second single. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
I Ain't Got You
  Date Performance: 1964-09-00, Running Time: 1:59
  Comments: by The Yardbirds. Recorded at Olympic Studios. Released October 1964 as the B-side of GOOD MORNING LITTLE SCHOOLGIRL. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
For Your LoveLyrics available
  Date Performance: 1964-12-00, Running Time: 2:30
  Comments: Recorded at IBC Studios. Released February 1965 as the A-side of THE YARDBIRDS' third single. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Got To Hurry
  Date Performance: 1964-12-00, Running Time: 2:35
  Comments: by The Yardbirds. Recorded at Olympic Studios. Released February 1965 as the B-side of FOR YOUR LOVE. Licensed from (P) Charly Records International APS, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Lonely Years
  Date Performance: 1965-10-00, Running Time: 3:21
  Comments: by John Mayall & Eric Clapton. Mono Version. Recorded at Wessex Sound Studio(s), Old Compton Street, London. Released August 1966 as the A-side of a single on Purdah Records (#45-3502). (P) 1966 The Decca Record Company Ltd. Licensed from The Polygram Licensing Division. Source: Original analogue tape
Bernard JenkinsInstrumental
  Date Performance: 1965-10-00, Running Time: 3:51
  Comments: by John Mayall & Eric Clapton. Mono Version. Recorded at Wessex Sound Studio(s), Old Compton Street, London. Released August 1966 as the B-side of a single on Purdah Records (#45-3502). (P) 1966 The Decca Record Company Ltd. Licensed from The Polygram Licensing Division. Source: Original analogue tape
Hideaway
  Date Performance: 1966, Running Time: 3:14
  Comments: Recorded at Decca West Hempstead Studios, Spring 1966. (P) The Decca Recording Company Ltd.
All Your Love
  Date Performance: 1966, Running Time: 3:35
  Comments: Recorded at Decca West Hempstead Studios, Spring 1966. (P) The Decca Recording Company Ltd.
Rambling On My Mind
  Date Performance: 1966, Running Time: 3:07
  Comments: Billed as "Ramblin' On My Mind". Recorded at Decca West Hempstead Studios, Spring 1966. (P) The Decca Recording Company Ltd.
Have You Ever Loved A Woman
  Date Performance: 1966-04-00, Running Time: 6:41
  Comments: by John Mayall's Bluesbreakers. Recorded live at the Flamingo Club, London. (P) The Decca Recording Company Ltd.
Wrapping Paper
  Date Performance: 1966, Running Time: 2:21
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Chalk Farm Studios, London, Summer 1966. Released October 7, 1966 as the A-side of CREAM'S first single. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
I Feel Free
  Date Performance: 1966, Running Time: 2:52
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Mayfair Studios, London, Full 1966. Released December 1966 as the A-side of CREAM'S second single. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Spoonful
  Date Performance: 1966, Running Time: 6:30
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Mayfair Studios, London, Full 1966. From FRESH CREAM, released December 1966. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Hey Lawdy Mama
  Date Performance: 1966-12-00, Running Time: 1:50
  Comments: by Cream. Billed as "Lawdy Mama". Recorded at BBC Studios, London. Previously unreleased. Licensed from & (P) BBC Enterprises Ltd.
Strange Brew
  Date Performance: 1967-04-00, Running Time: 2:46
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York. From DISRAELI GEARS, released November 1967. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Sunshine Of Your Love
  Date Performance: 1967-04-00, Running Time: 4:12
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York. From DISRAELI GEARS, released November 1967. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Tales Of Brave Ulysses
  Date Performance: 1967-04-00, Running Time: 2:46
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York. From DISRAELI GEARS, released November 1967. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Steppin' Out
  Date Performance: 1968-01-09, Running Time: 3:31
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at BBC Studios, London. Previously unreleased. Licensed from & (P) BBC Enterprises Ltd.
Disc Two:
Anyone For Tennis
  Date Performance: 1968-02-00, Running Time: 2:37
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at Atlantic Studios, New York. Released May 1968 as the A-side of a single. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
White Room
  Date Performance: 1968-02-00, Running Time: 4:56
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at BBC Studios, London, August 1967 and Atlantic Studios, New York, February 1968. From WHEELS OF FIRE, released August 1968. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Crossroads
  Date Performance: 1968-03-00, Running Time: 4:14
  Comments: (Live) by Cream. Recorded live at the Fillmore West, San Francisco. From WHEELS OF FIRE, released August 1968. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Badge
  Date Performance: 1968-12-00, Running Time: 2:43
  Comments: by Cream. Recorded at IBC Studios, London. From GOODBYE, released March 1969. George Harrison appears courtesy of EMI/Capitol Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Presence Of The Lord
  Date Performance: 1969-02-00, Running Time: 4:48
  Comments: by Blind Faith. Recorded at Morgan Studios, London. From BLIND FAITH, released August 1969. Steve Winwood appears courtesy of Island Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Can't Find My Way Home
  Date Performance: 1969-06-00, Running Time: 3:15
  Comments: by Blind Faith. Recorded at Olympics Studios, London. From BLIND FAITH, released August 1969. Steve Winwood appears courtesy of Island Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Sleeping In The Ground
  Date Performance: 1969-06-00, Running Time: 2:50
  Comments: by Blind Faith. Recorded at Morgan Studios, London during the BLIND FAITH sessions. Remixed at PolyGram Studios, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. Steve Winwood appears courtesy of Island Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Comin' Home
  Date Performance: 1969-12-00, Running Time: 3:15
  Comments: Recorded at A&M Studios, Hollywood. Released as a single December 1969. Licensed courtesy of Sony Music Special Products. (P) Sony Music Entertainment Inc.
Blues Power
  Date Performance: 1970-01-00, Running Time: 3:06
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at the Village Recorder, Los Angeles. From ERIC CLAPTON, released August 1970. Leon Russell appears courtesy of Shelter Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
After Midnight
  Date Performance: 1970-01-00, Running Time: 3:17
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at the Village Recorder, Los Angeles. Previously unreleased alternate mix from ERIC CLAPTON, released August 1970. Leon Russell appears courtesy of Shelter Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Let It Rain
  Date Performance: 1970-01-00, Running Time: 5:01
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at the Village Recorder, Los Angeles. From ERIC CLAPTON, released August 1970. Leon Russell appears courtesy of Shelter Records. Stephen Stills appears courtesy of Atlantic Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Tell The Truth
  Date Performance: 1970-08-05, Running Time: 3:23
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominoes. Recorded at Trident Studios, London. Released August 1970 as the A-sdie of DEREK AND THE DOMINOES first single, but was subsequently recalled. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Roll It Over
  Date Performance: 1970, Running Time: 4:29
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominoes. Recorded at Friar Park Studio, Henley-on-Thames, Summer 1970 during sessions for George Harrison's ALL THINGS MUST PASS and mixed at Trident Studios, London, August 5, 1970. Released August 1970 as the B-side of TELL THE TRUTH. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. George Harrison appears courtesy of EMI/Capitol Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Layla
  Date Performance: 1970-10-01, Running Time: 7:07
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida, September 9, 1970 and October 1, 1970. From LAYLA AND OTHER ASSORTED LOVE SONGS, released December 1970. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, October 1987. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Mean Old WorldLyrics available
  Date Performance: 1970-10-02, Running Time: 3:50
  Comments: by Eric Clapton & Duane Allman. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida during the LAYLA sessions. (P) 1972 Polygram International Music B.V.
Key To The Highway
  Date Performance: 1970-10-23, Running Time: 6:27
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded live at the Fillmore East, New York. Remixed at PolyGram Studios, New Jersey, July, 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Crossroads
  Date Performance: 1970-10-23, Running Time: 8:17
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded live at the Fillmore East, New York. Remixed at PolyGram Studios, New Jersey, July, 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Disc Three:
Got To Get Better In A Little While
  Date Performance: 1971-05-00, Running Time: 5:31
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London during sessions for THE DOMINOS' second album. This recording was never completed (note the absence of Bobby Whitlock) and lacks keyboards and chorus vocals. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Evil
  Date Performance: 1971-05-00, Running Time: 4:25
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London during sessions for THE DOMINOS' second album. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
One More Chance
  Date Performance: 1971-05-00, Running Time: 3:17
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London during sessions for THE DOMINOS' second album. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Mean Old Frisco
  Date Performance: 1971-05-00, Running Time: 4:02
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London during sessions for THE DOMINOS' second album. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Snake Lake Blues
  Date Performance: 1971-05-00, Running Time: 3:33
  Comments: by Derek & The Dominos. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London during sessions for THE DOMINOS' second album. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Let It Grow
  Date Performance: 1974-05-00, Running Time: 4:56
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida. From 461 OCEAN BOULEVARD, released August 1974. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Ain't That Lovin' You
  Date Performance: 1974-04-00, Running Time: 5:26
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida, during sessions for 461 OCEAN BOULEVARD. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. Dave Mason appears courtesy of CBS Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Motherless Children
  Date Performance: 1974-05-00, Running Time: 4:51
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida. From 461 OCEAN BOULEVARD, released August 1974. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
I Shot The Sheriff
  Date Performance: 1974-12-05, Running Time: 7:48
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded live at the Hammersmith Odeon, London. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Better Make It Through Today
  Date Performance: 1974-09-00, Running Time: 4:05
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Dynamic Sounds Studios, Kingston, Jamaica. From THERE'S ONE IN EVERY CROWD, released April 1975. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
The Sky Is Crying
  Date Performance: 1974-09-00, Running Time: 3:57
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Dynamic Sounds Studios, Kingston, Jamaica. From THERE'S ONE IN EVERY CROWD, released April 1975. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
I Found A Love
  Date Performance: 1974-09-00, Running Time: 3:38
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Dynamic Sounds Studios, Kingston, Jamaica during sessions for THERE'S ONE IN EVERY CROWD. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
It Hurts Me TooLyrics available
  Date Performance: 1974-09-00, Running Time: 5:34
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Billed as "(When Things Go Wrong) It Hurts Me Too". Recorded at Dynamic Sounds Studios, Kingston, Jamaica during sessions for THERE'S ONE IN EVERY CROWD. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Whatcha Gonna Do
  Date Performance: 1974-09-00, Running Time: 3:01
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Dynamic Sounds Studios, Kingston, Jamaica during sessions for THERE'S ONE IN EVERY CROWD. Remixed at House of Music, New Jersey, September 1987. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Knockin' On Heaven's Door
  Date Performance: 1975-06-16, Running Time: 4:21
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida. Released August 1975 as the A-side of a single. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Someone Like You
  Date Performance: 1975-07-10, Running Time: 4:30
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida. Released August 1975 as the B-side of KNOCKIN' ON HEAVEN'S DOOR. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Disc Four:
Hello Old Friend
  Date Performance: 1976-03-00, Running Time: 3:36
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Shangri-La Studios, Malibu and the Village Recorder, Los Angeles. From NO REASON TO CRY, released August 1976. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Sign Language
  Date Performance: 1976-03-00, Running Time: 2:56
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Shangri-La Studios, Malibu and the Village Recorder, Los Angeles. From NO REASON TO CRY, released August 1976. Bob Dylan appears courtesy of CBS Records. Robbie Robertson appears courtesy of Capitol Records. Ron Wood appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Further On Up The Road
  Date Performance: 1977-04-28, Running Time: 6:18
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded live at the Hammersmith Odeon, London. Previously unreleased. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Lay Down Sally
  Date Performance: 1977-05-00, Running Time: 3:50
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London. From SLOWHAND, released November 1977. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Wonderful Tonight
  Date Performance: 1977-05-00, Running Time: 3:45
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London. From SLOWHAND, released November 1977. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Cocaine
  Date Performance: 1977-05-00, Running Time: 3:35
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London. From SLOWHAND, released November 1977. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Promises
  Date Performance: 1978-09-00, Running Time: 3:00
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London, August/September 1978. From BACKLESS, released November 1978. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
If I Don't Be There By Morning
  Date Performance: 1978-09-00, Running Time: 4:34
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Olympic Studios, London, August/September 1978. From BACKLESS, released November 1978. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
Double TroubleLyrics available
  Date Performance: 1979-12-00, Running Time: 8:01
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded live at the Budokan Theatre, Tokyo. From JUST ONE NIGHT, released May 1980. (P) Montgrove Management Ltd.
I Can't Stand It
  Date Performance: 1980, Running Time: 4:01
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas, Summer 1980. From ANOTHER TICKET, released February 1981. (P) Montgrove Management Ltd.
The Shape You're In
  Date Performance: 1982, Running Time: 4:09
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas, Fall 1982. From MONEY AND CIGARETTES, released February 1983. John Sambataro appears courtesy of Atlantic Records. Licensed from Warner Bros. Records (for the U.S.) & WEA International (for the world outside the U.S.). Produced By Tom Dowd for Tom Dowd Productions.
Heaven Is One Step Away
  Date Performance: 1984, Running Time: 4:09
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Air Studios, Montserrat, West Indies, Spring 1984 during the BEHIND THE SUN sessions. Mixed at Townhouse Studios, London. Originally released February 1985 as an extra track on the 12" single of FOREVER MAN. Phil Collins appears courtesy of Atlantic Records and Virgin Records. Licensed from Warner Bros. Records Inc. (for the U.S.) & WEA International (for the world outside the U.S.).
She's Waiting
  Date Performance: 1984, Running Time: 4:55
  Comments: Recorded at Air Studios, Montserrat, West Indies. Spring 1984. Mixed at Townhouse Studios, London. Originally released February 1985 as an extra track on the 12" single of FOREVER MAN. Phil Collins appears courtesy of Atlantic Records and Virgin Records. Licensed from Warner Bros. Records Inc. (for the U.S.) & WEA International (for the world outside the U.S.).
Too BadLyrics available
  Date Performance: 1984, Running Time: 2:37
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Air Studios, Montserrat, West Indies, Spring 1984 during the BEHIND THE SUN sessions. Mixed at Townhouse Studios, London. Released February 1985 as the B-side of FOREVER MAN. Phil Collins appears courtesy of Atlantic Records and Virgin Records. Licensed from Warner Bros. Records Inc. (for the U.S.) & WEA International (for the world outside the U.S.).
Miss You
  Date Performance: 1986, Running Time: 5:05
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Sunset Sound Studios, Los Angeles, Spring 1986 and mixed at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida, Fall 1986. From AUGUST, released November 1986. Phil Collins appears courtesy of Atlantic Records and Virgin Records. Licensed from Warner Bros. Records Inc. (for the U.S.) & WEA International (for the world outside the U.S.).
Wanna Make Love To You
  Date Performance: 1986, Running Time: 5:43
  Comments: by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Sunset Sound Studios, Los Angeles, Spring 1986 and mixed at Criteria Studios, Miami, Florida, Fall 1986 during the AUGUST sessions. Released January 1987 as an extra track on the 12" single of BEHIND THE MASK. Phil Collins appears courtesy of Atlantic Records and Virgin Records. Licensed from Warner Bros. Records Inc. (for the U.S.) & WEA International (for the world outside the U.S.).
After Midnight
  Date Performance: 1987-09-00, Running Time: 4:05
  Comments: (Remake) by Eric Clapton. Recorded at Power Station Studios, New York and mixed at Streeterville Studios, Chicago. Special thanks to Michelob Beer and DDB Needham Worldwide. (P) Polygram International Music B.V.
    Guest Appearances »

Jerry Allison, Brian Auger, Dave Bargerone, Tom Bernfeld, Delaney Bramlett, Delaney Bramlett, Bonnie Bramlett, Bonnie Bramlett, Mike/Michael Brecker, Randy/Randal Brecker, Gary Brooker, Alan Clark, Phil(ip) (David Charles) Collins, Ry Cooder, Rita Coolidge, Rita Coolidge, Ray Cooper, Sonny Curtis, Jesse Ed Davis, Donald (Duck) Dunn, Bob Dylan (Robert Allen Zimmerman), Nathan East, Yvonne Elliman, Jon Faddis, Albhy Galuten, Jim Gordon, Jim Gordon, George Harrison, Roger Hawkins, Bobby Keys, Bobby Keys, Chuck Kirkpatrick, Katie Kissoon, Albert Lee, Marcy Levy (Marcella Detroit), Dave Markee, Dave Mason, Shaun Murphy, Andy Newmark, Tessa Niles, Jamie Oldaker, Felix Pappalardi, Sergio Pastora/Rodriguez, Greg Phillinganes, Denny Piercey, Jim Price, Jim Price, Carl Radle, Carl Radle, Robbie (Jaime Robert) Robertson (Klegerman), Peter Robinson, Leon Russell (Claude Bridges), John Sambataro/Sambatero, Dick Sims, Henry Spinetti, Chris Stainton, Stephen Stills, George E. Terry, Peter Tosh (Winston Hubert McIntosh), Bobby Whitlock, Bobby Whitlock, Ron(nie) Wood

    Released »

1988-04-18

    Format »

Domestic Vinyl/CD Album

    Other Appearances »
Billy Boy Arnold (Songwriter), James C. Bracken (Songwriter), Bonnie Bramlett (Songwriter), Bonnie Bramlett (Songwriter), Delaney Bramlett (Songwriter), Delaney Bramlett (Songwriter), Mary Russell Bridges (Songwriter), Big Bill Broonzy (William Lee Conley) (Songwriter), Pete(r) (Constantine) Brown (Songwriter), Jack Bruce (John Symon Asher) (Songwriter), Jack Bruce (John Symon Asher) (Songwriter), J.J. (John Winston) Cale (Songwriter), Clarence Carter (Songwriter), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Songwriter), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Songwriter), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Songwriter), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Songwriter), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Songwriter), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Songwriter), Gail Collins (Songwriter), Bobby Colomby/Columby (Songwriter), Arthur Big Boy Crudup (Songwriter), Willie Dixon (Songwriter), Bob Dylan (Robert Allen Zimmerman) (Songwriter), Rich(ard) Feldman (Songwriter), Giorgio Gomelsky (Songwriter), Jim Gordon (Songwriter), Jim Gordon (Songwriter), Graham (Keith) Gouldman (Songwriter), George Harrison (Songwriter), John Lee Hooker (Songwriter), Elmore James (Songwriter), Robert Johnson (Songwriter), Michael Kamen (Songwriter), Freddie/Freddy King (Songwriter), Morris Levy (Songwriter), Marcy Levy (Marcella Detroit) (Songwriter), Clarence L. Lewis (Songwriter), Roger Linn (Songwriter), Mance Lipscomb (Songwriter), Arthur Louis (Songwriter), Bob Marley (Songwriter), Bob Marley (Songwriter), John Mayall (Songwriter), John Mayall (Songwriter), Sam Myers (Songwriter), Billy Myles (Songwriter), Felix Pappalardi (Songwriter), Greg Phillinganes (Songwriter), Tampa Red (Hudson Whittaker) (Songwriter), (Mathis) Jimmy (James) Reed (Songwriter), Keith Relf (Songwriter), Keith Relf (Songwriter), Don Robey (Deadric Malone) (Songwriter), Peter Robinson (Songwriter), Otis Rush (Songwriter), Leon Russell (Claude Bridges) (Songwriter), Charles Segar (Songwriter), Martin Sharp (Songwriter), Bumble Bee Slim (Amos Easton) (Songwriter), Helena Springs (Songwriter), George E. Terry (Songwriter), Sonny (Alfonso) Thompson (Songwriter), Peter Tosh (Winston Hubert McIntosh) (Songwriter), Allen (Tousan) Toussaint (Naomi Neville) (Songwriter), Joe Medwich Veasey (Songwriter), T-Bone (Aaron Thibeaux) Walker (Songwriter), Bobby Whitlock (Songwriter), Bobby Whitlock (Songwriter), Jerry (Lynn) Williams (Songwriter), Sonny Boy (John Lee) Williamson (Songwriter), Steve Winwood (Songwriter), Steve Winwood (Songwriter), Richard E Aaron (Photography), David Gahr (Photography), Bob Gruen (Photography), Michael Ochs Archive(s) Ltd. (Photography), Paul Natkin (Photography), Anastasia Pantsios (Photography), Don Paulsen (Photography), Pictoral Press (Photography), Joseph/Joe Sia (Photography), Star File/Starfile (Photography), The Decca Record Co., Ltd. (British) (Photography), Barry Wentzell (Photography), Vinnie Zuffante (Photography), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Executive Producer), Tom Dowd (Executive Producer), Roger Forrester (Executive Producer), George McManus (Executive Producer), Harry Palmer (Executive Producer), Charles Shiddell (Executive Producer), Bill Levenson (Liner Notes), Duane Allman (Produced By), Duane Allman (Produced By), Jon Astley (Produced By), Delaney Bramlett (Produced By), Delaney Bramlett (Produced By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Produced By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Produced By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Produced By), Phil(ip) (David Charles) Collins (Produced By), Derek And The Dominos (Produced By), Tom Dowd (Produced By), Tom Dowd (Produced By), Chris Dreja (Produced By), Chris Dreja (Produced By), Rob Fraboni (Produced By), Albhy Galuten (Produced By), Giorgio Gomelsky (Produced By), Jim Gordon (Produced By), Jim Gordon (Produced By), Jim Harris (Produced By), Glyn Johns (Produced By), Jim McCarty (Produced By), Jim McCarty (Produced By), Peter McHugh (Produced By), Jimmy Miller (Produced By), Felix Pappalardi (Produced By), Carl Radle (Produced By), Carl Radle (Produced By), Keith Relf (Produced By), Keith Relf (Produced By), Paul Samwell-Smith (Produced By), Paul Samwell-Smith (Produced By), Phil Spector (Produced By), The Yardbirds (Produced By), Mike Vernon (Produced By), Bobby Whitlock (Produced By), Bobby Whitlock (Produced By), Jon Astley (Engineered By), Tom Dowd (Engineered By), Glyn Johns (Engineered By), Nick Launay (Engineered By), Justin Niebank (Engineered By), Dennis M. Drake (Remixed By), John Jansen (Remixed By), Greg Calbi (Mastered By), Duane Allman (Arranged By), Duane Allman (Arranged By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Arranged By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Arranged By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Arranged By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Arranged By), Derek And The Dominos (Arranged By), Jim Gordon (Arranged By), Jim Gordon (Arranged By), Carl Radle (Arranged By), Carl Radle (Arranged By), Bobby Whitlock (Arranged By), Bobby Whitlock (Arranged By), Robert Stigwood (Production), Bill Levenson (Compilation Produced By), Rhonda Schoen (Digital Editing By), Steve Chase (Mixing Assisted By), Michael Bays (Art Direction By), Mitchell Kanner (Design By), Steve Jackson (Engineering Assisted By), Leon Pendarvis (Horns Arranged By), Eric (Patrick) Clapton (Production Association), Tom Dowd (Production Association), Carl Radle (Production Association), Anthony DeCurtis (Booklet Essay By), Ron(nie) Wood (Cover Portrait By), Smay Vision (Redesign By), Wherefore Art? (Redesign By), Service Art Studio (Typography By), Service Art Studio (Art Production By), Bill Inglot (Yardbirds Masters Digitally Prepared By), Ken Perry (Yardbirds Masters Digitally Prepared By), Sonic Solutions (Yardbirds Demos Digitally Restored By)

    Record Label »
Polygram

    Catalogue Number »

835 261-2

    Running Time »

293:03

    Liner Notes »

Typography and Art Production by Service Art Studio, New York.

Mastered at Sterling Sound, New York.

Digital editing at Sterling Sound, New York.

This compilation was digitally compiled and mastered from first generation master tapes or from tapes mixed specifically for it.

The YARDBIRDS masters were digitally prepared at K-Disc, Los Angeles, CA.

The YARDBIRDS demos were digitally restored by Sonic Solutions, San Francisco, CA.

CROSSROADS is the result of nearly 18 months of research and planning, all of which could not have been possible without the advice, input, and work of many friends.

I'd like to thank the following for their support and contributions:

David Altschul, Harry Anger, Dick Asher, Nelson Ayres, Michael Bays, Maryellen Benenati (sic), John Bolowsky, Dana Brandwein, Kathleen Brown, Jack Bruce, Tony Buzzeo, Greg Calbi, Kathy Cantwell, Phil Carson, Ray Coleman, Irene and Charlie Conrad, Tom Coyne, Anthony DeCurtis, Paul Del Campo, Cathy Doherty, Tom Dowd, Dennis Drake, Patti Drosins, Oliver Dziggel, Len Epand, Barry Fisch, David Gahr, Rick Gans, Felicia Gearhart, Sam Ginsburg, Ron Goldsmith, Suha Gur, Jim Harris, Laura Harris, Bas Hartong, Pam Haslam, Stefan Heller, Scott Hightower, Horst Hohenboeken, Bill Inglot, Bob Jamieson, John Jansen, Beebe Jennings, Mitchell Kanner, Peter Kaundinya, Steve Kleinberg, John Kubick, Larry Lachmann, Mark Leviton, Ronni Lippin, Virginia Lohle, Holden Mann, Gene Masson, John Mayall, George McManus, Roger Myhill, Eli Okun, Carlos Olms, Cliff O'Sullivan, Harry Palmer, Don Paulsen, Tony Pepitone, Ken Perry, Elena Petrone, Mary Sauer, Rhonda Schoen, Margarita Scheckel, Charles Shiddell, Tom Steenbergen, Horst Stiller, Dan Sullivan, Nancy Sullivan, Sandy Summer, Terri Tierney, John Tracy, Jim Urie, Cathy Vangieri, Mathieu Vansweevelt, Kim Walsh, Dick Wingate, Ron Wood, Larry Yelen, Jean Luc Young

With a very special thanks to Roger Forrester and Diana Puplett.

Bill Levenson
April 1988

ERIC CLAPTON FAN CLUB
SLOWHAND
P.0. BOX 1062
LONDON, NW1 5HP
ENGLAND

Features all the classics plus dozens of rare and unreleased recordings by:

THE YARDBIRDS
JOHN MAYALL and ERIC CLAPTON
JOHN MAYALL'S BLUESBREAKERS
CREAM
BLIND FAITH
DELANEY AND BONNIE AND FRIENDS
DEREK AND THE DOMINOES
and ERIC CLAPTON

THE YARDBIRDS

Boom Boom
Honey In Your Hips
Baby What's Wrong
I Wish You Would
A Certain Girl
Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
I Ain't Got You
For Your Love
Got To Hurry

JOHN MAYALL and ERIC CLAPTON

Lonely Years
Bernard Jenkins

JOHN MAYALL'S BLUESBREAKERS

Hideaway
All Your Love
Ramblin' On My Mind
Have You Ever Loved A Woman

CREAM

Wrapping Paper
I Feel Free
Spoonful
Lawdy Mama
Strange Brew
Sunshine Of Your Love
Tales Of Brave Ulysses
Steppin' Out
Anyone For Tennis
White Room
Crossroads
Badge

BLIND FAITH

Presence Of The Lord
Can't Find My Way Home
Sleeping In The Ground

DELANEY AND BONNIE AND FRIENDS

Comin' Home

DEREK AND THE DOMINOES

Tell The Truth
Roll It Over
Layla
Mean Old World
Key To The Highway
Crossroads
Got To Get Better In A Little While
Evil
One More Chance
Mean Old Frisco
Snake Lake Blues

ERIC CLAPTON

Blues Power
After Midnight
Let It Rain
Let It Grow
Ain't That Lovin' You
Motherless Children
I Shot The Sheriff
Better Make It Through Today
The Sky Is Crying
I Found A Love
(When Things Go Wrong) It Hurts Me Too
Whatcha Gonna Do
Knockin' On Heaven's Door
Someone Like You
Hello Old Friend
Sign Language
Further On Up The Road
Lay Down Sally
Wonderful Tonight
Cocaine
Promises
If I Don't Be There By Morning
Double Trouble
I Can't Stand It
The Shape You're In
Heaven Is One Step Away
She's Waiting
Too Bad
Miss You
Wanna Make Love To You
After Midnight

PHOTO CREDITS:

PAGE 4 ERIC CLAPTON, 1963 Courtesy of Pictorial Press/STAR FILE
PAGE 5 THE YARDBIRDS, 1963 Courtesy of Michael Ochs Archives
PAGE 6 THE YARDBIRDS, 1964 Courtesy of Michael Ochs Archives
PAGE 6/7 BLUESBREAKERS, 1966 Courtesy of The Decca Record Co., Ltd.
PAGE 8 ERIC CLAPTON, 1966 Courtesy of Barry Wentzell/STAR FILE
PAGE 8 CREAM, 1966 Courtesy of Pictorial Press/STAR FILE
PAGE 9 ERIC CLAPTON, 1967 Courtesy of Don Paulsen
PAGE 9 CREAM, 1967 Courtesy of Pictorial Press/STAR FILE
PAGE 9 CREAM, 1968 Courtesy of Barry Wentzell/STAR FILE
PAGE 10 ERIC CLAPTON, 1969 Courtesy of David Gahr
PAGE 10 ERIC CLAPTON, 1969 Courtesy of David Gahr
PAGE 10/11 BLIND FAITH, 1969 Courtesy of David Gahr
PAGE 12 DELANEY AND BONNIE, 1969 Courtesy of Joseph Sia/STAR FILE
PAGE 12 ERIC CLAPTON, 1970 Courtesy of Barry Wentzell/STAR FILE
PAGE 12 ERIC CLAPTON and GEORGE HARRISON, 1970 Courtesy of Barry Wentzell/STAR FILE
PAGE 12/13 ERIC CLAPTON, 1970 Courtesy of Barry Wentzell/STAR FILE
PAGE 14 ERIC CLAPTON, 1970 Courtesy of Joseph Sia/STAR FILE
PAGE 15 DEREK AND THE DOMINOS, 1970 Courtesy of Joseph Sia/STAR FILE
PAGE 16/17 STEVE WINWOOD, RON WOOD, RICK GRECH, ERIC CLAPTON and PETE TOWNSHEND - RAINBOW CONCERT, 1973 Courtesy of Barry Wentzell/STAR FILE
PAGE 17 ERIC CLAPTON, 1974 Courtesy of David Gahr
PAGE 18 ERIC CLAPTON, 1974 Courtesy of Joseph Sia/STAR FILE
PAGE 18 ERIC CLAPTON, 1975 Courtesy of Joseph Sia/STAR FILE
PAGE 19 ERIC CLAPTON, 1977 Courtesy of Anastasia Pantsios/STAR FILE
PAGE 20 ERIC CLAPTON, 1978 Courtesy of Richard E. Aaron/STAR FILE
PAGE 21 ERIC CLAPTON, 1979 Courtesy of Joseph Sia/STAR FILE
PAGE 21 ERIC CLAPTON, MUDDY WATERS and JOHNNY WINTER, 1979 Courtesy of Paul Natkin/STAR FILE
PAGE 21 ERIC CLAPTON and RONNIE LANE - ARMS CONCERT, 1983 Courtesy of Vinnie Zuffante/STAR FILE
PAGE 22 ERIC CLAPTON, 1985 Courtesy of Bob Gruen/STAR FILE
PAGE 23 ERIC CLAPTON, 1987 Courtesy of Vinnie Zuffante/STAR FILE
PAGE 24/25 ELTON JOHN, RINGO STARR, ERIC CLAPTON, JEFF LYNNE and GEORGE HARRISON - PRINCE'S TRUST, 1987 Courtesy og Vinnie Zuffante/STAR FILE

ERIC CLAPTON - A LIFE AT THE CROSSROADS:

Over the past twenty-five years Eric Clapton's extraordinary career has traced a dramatic progression marked by musical pioneering, restless shifts of direction, spiritual awakenings, backsliding and, at one point, a total retreat into isolation. Clapton's mysterious, internally determined moves from budding pop star to purist blues man to rock guitar hero to laid-back troubadour have challenged the faithful and won new converts at every turn.

Through all the personal and artistic upheavals, part of Eric Clapton has consistently remained detached and calm, as if he accepted in his heart that he was destined for such shocks - and that acceptance brought a certain peace. At the same time he has maintained a fierce, private idealism about his playing. "My driving philosophy about making music," he told Rolling Stone in 1974, "is that you can reduce it all down to one note if that note is played with the right kind of feeling and with the right kind of sincerity."

It makes sense, then, that Robert Johnson's tough, transcendent masterpiece, "Crossroads," has become Clapton's signature song. On the path of life, crossroads are where the breakdowns and breakthroughs come, where danger and adventure lie. As he has forged and disbanded musical alliances, altered his sound and his look, pursued and dodged fame, Eric Clapton has brought himself to the crossroads and proven himself time and time again.

Clapton's bold search for his own identity is the source both of his enormous artistic achievement and his inner strife. That search acquired its momentum in the earliest years of his life. Clapton was born on March 30th, 1945 in Ripley, a small village about thirty miles outside - and a universe away from - London. His mother raised him until he was two years old, at which point she moved abroad, leaving him in the loving hands of her mother and stepfather.

The elderly couple was indulgent of Eric - they bought him his first guitar on an installment plan when he was in his teens - but the stigma of being born out of wedlock in a small town made a forceful impression on him. The "secret" of Clapton's illegitimacy was a secret only from him. "I was raised by my grandparents, thinking that they were my parents, up until I was nine years old," Clapton explained to J.D. Considine in Musician in 1986. "That's when the shock came up, when I found out - from outside sources - that they weren't my parents, they were my grandparents. I went into a kind of... shock, which lasted through my teens, really, and started to turn me into the kind of person I am now."

Clapton was more pointed in Ray Coleman's authorised biography, Clapton!, published in 1985, about how hard it was to learn the truth about his background. "My feeling of a lack of identity started to rear its head then," he told Coleman. "And it explains a lot of my behaviour throughout my life; it changed my outlook and my physical appearance so much. Because I still don't know who I am."

Like so many rockers, Clapton did a brief stint in art school - the Kingston College of Art, in his case. His formal education got derailed, however, when he was about sixteen and began to make the bohemian scene in London, where he discovered folk-blues. Eventually he would go on to play acoustic gigs in coffee-houses and pubs, accompanied by a vocalist and doing tunes by Big Bill Broonzy, Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Blind Boy Fuller.

Another revelation struck around that time, as well. "Every Friday night, there would be a meeting at someone's house, and people would turn up with the latest imported records from the States," Clapton recalled in a 1985 Rolling Stone interview with Robert Palmer. "And shortly, someone showed up with that Chess album, The Best Of Muddy Waters, and something by Howlin' Wolf. And that was it for me. Then I sort of took a step back, discovered Robert Johnson and made the connection to Muddy." In later days, Clapton would come to refer to Muddy Waters as his "father." And Johnson's haunted country blues affected Clapton so deeply that he would tell Dan Forte in Guitar Player more than two decades later, "Both of the Robert Johnson albums (King of the Delta Blues Singers, Volumes 1 and 2) actually cover all of my desires musically. Every angle of expression and every emotion is expressed on both of those albums."

The first band Clapton joined was the fledgling R&B outfit, the Roosters. The Roosters would last only a few months, from March to October of 1963, according to rock historian Pete Frame. But during that period the band's bassist, Tom McGuinness, who later played with Manfred Mann and McGuinness Flint, turned Clapton on to blues guitarist Freddie King's instrumental "Hideaway," and another influential figure entered Clapton's pantheon. Playing John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters' tunes with the Roosters sharpened Clapton's playing, according to the band's pianist Ben Palmer, one of the guitarist's oldest friends. "It was immediately obvious that he was something that none of the rest of us were," Palmer says in Clapton! "And he had a fluency and command that seemed endless. The telling point was that he didn't mind taking solos, which people of our standard often did because we weren't up to it."

Following an extremely short stay with the pop band Casey Jones and the Engineers - headed by Liverpool singer Brian Cassar, who was trying to cash in on the record-company signing spree in the wake of the Beatles' success - Clapton joined the seminal Sixties band, the Yardbirds, in October of 1963. In their early days the Yardbirds - who, in addition to Clapton, consisted of vocalist Keith Relf, guitarist Chris Dreja, bassist Paul Samwell-Smith and drummer Jim McCarty - were an exuberant London R&B band that covered tunes like John Lee Hooker's "Boom Boom" and Billy Boy Arnold's "I Wish You Would."

On "I Ain't Got You" - and in his brief solo on the catchy New Orleans novelty, "A Certain Girl" - Clapton flashes the biting, fiercely articulate phrasing characteristic of his best playing. But in general Clapton was inhibited by the Yardbirds' harmonica-driven rave-up style. Despite his youth, Clapton was sufficiently confident of his musical tastes to become disgruntled when the Yardbirds, at the urging of manager Giorgio Gomelsky, edged away from the blues in order to pursue pop success. Clapton left the group by mutual agreement shortly after they recorded Graham Gouldman's "For Your Love" in quest of a hit.

Splitting from the Yardbirds on the brink of their commercial breakthrough was the first time Clapton displayed his willingness to pursue his own musical vision at whatever the cost - and it was far from the last. However high-minded and necessary such decisions were, Clapton is not beyond questioning them to a degree, in retrospect. "I took it all far too seriously," he states in Clapton! "Perhaps if I'd been able to temper it, I might not have been so frustrated... I still take it too seriously, in terms of relationships and being able to get on with other musicians. I'm far too judgemental, and in those days I was a complete purist. If it wasn't black music, it was rubbish."

Of course, seriousness about black music was hardly a problem during Clapton's tenure with John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in 1965 and 1966. A keyboardist with a vocal style derived from Mose Allison and Freddie King, Mayall was twelve years Clapton's senior and the father of the British blues scene. Mayall's Bluesbreakers were the proving ground for a host of ambitious young musicians in the mid to late Sixties, including Jack Bruce, Mick Taylor, Peter Green, Aynsley Dunbar, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood.

Clapton raided Mayall's vast collection of singles, and the two men thrived on each other's enthusiasm, as is evidenced by the raw Chicago blues power of their duet on "Lonely Years" and the spry assurance of their instrumental jam, "Bernard Jenkins." Though barely into his twenties, Clapton shaped an aggressive, tonally rich playing style with the Bluesbreakers. Drawing on Freddie King, Otis Rush and Buddy Guy in a way that blended respect with his own precocious mastery, Clapton unleashed some of the finest blues guitar playing of his generation on the 1966 Bluesbreakers - John Mayall with Eric Clapton LP. In addition, Clapton sang his first lead vocal on that record, a spare, eloquent reading of Robert Johnson's "Ramblin' On My Mind" that captures all that song's edgy amalgam of anguish and submerged threat.

Clapton's scorching club performances in London during his time with Mayall - represented in this collection by his ignition of Billy Myles' "Have You Ever Loved a Woman," with Jack Bruce on bass - quickly established a cult following for the young guitarist. "Clapton Is God" graffiti began appearing arund the city, defining a central tenet of the Clapton mythology to this day. And though the comparisons with God would prove to be a hellhound on Clapton's trail, he understandably received the adulation more positively at first.

"My vanity was incredibly boosted by that 'God' thing," Clapton says in Coleman's biography. "I didn't think there was anyone around at that time doing what I was doing, playing the blues as straight as me. I was trying to do it absolutely according to its rules. Oh yeah, I was very confident. I didn't think there was anybody as good."

However appealing, the adulation did not prevent Clapton from taking a three-month break from the Bluesbreakers in 1965, and it was during that period that Jack Bruce joined the band. Playing with Bruce upon his return spun Clapton's head around. Bruce's jazz background gave his playing an improvisational flair, and Clapton, who, despite his own purist impulses, had been feeling somewhat constrained in Mayall's strict blues format, felt a new sense of freedom. "Most of what we were doing with Mayall was imitating the records we got, but Jack had something else," Clapton told Rolling Stone, "he had no reverence for what we were doing, and so he was composing new parts as he went along playing. I literally had never heard that before, and it took me someplace else. I thought, well, if he could do that, and I could, and we could get a drummer...I could be Buddy Guy with a composing bass player. And that's how Cream came about."

Formed in 1966, Cream's impact on the world of pop music was immense. Rock bands to that point had played almost exclusively before crowds of screaming teeny-boppers - a major reason why live performance was beginning to seem pointless to bands whose music and ideas were becoming more sophisticated. Discussing rock and roll in music terms was a joke to the mainsteam media, and alternative media had not yet sprung up. Cream was a primary catalyst in transforming rock and roll into music that could be performed in concert before adults and analyzed with the same rigor that blues or jazz could be. The declaration implicit in the band's name was itself a demand to be taken seriously. In Coleman's terse summary "They made musicianship hip." Clapton forever defined the role of guitar hero at this point, and with Bruce on bass and the redoubtable Ginger Baker on drums, Cream defined the power trio.

In their range and power, Cream forced a dichotomy between the studio and the stage. In the studio, the band was something like a later evolution of the Yardbirds. They could contain hip innovations within pop-song structures, as on "I Feel Free"; rework the blues, as on Willie Dixon's "Spoonful" and the Albert King-derived "Strange Brew"; journey into psychedelic wonderland, as on "Tales of Brave Ulysses" and "White Room"; or simply cut a radio-perfect, guitar-charged hit like "Sunshine of Your Love."

Live, however, Cream was essentially a rock-and-roll jazz band. Songs became thematic statements that provided the occasion for lengthy improvisational jams, with Baker and Bruce muscling each other into unexplored territory as Clapton wailed and roared above them. The propulsive live version of "Crossroads" included here is a Cream classic, and a masterpiece of concision - edited, as it was, by engineer Tom Dowd for the Wheels of Fire album - compared to the much longer renditions the band typically fired up.

The hero-worship Clapton had inspired when he was with the Bluesbreakers reached a fever pitch with Cream. The pressures of the inordinate praise heaped upon him, the wild improvisational competitiveness of Cream's gigs, and the fighting that resulted from Bruce and Baker's inability to get along gradually took their toll on Clapton.

"All during Cream I was riding high on the 'Clapton Is God' myth that had been started up," Clapton told Robert Palmer. "Then we got our first kind of bad review, which, funnily enough, was in Rolling Stone. The magazine ran an interview with us in which we were really praising ourselves, and it was followed by a review that said how boring and repetitious our performance had been. And it was true!... I immediately decided that that was the end of the band."

Cream split up in November of 1968, about six months after that review appeared, and Clapton began jamming with Steve Winwood, the keyboardist and sterling R&B vocalist who had made his own youthful mark with the Spencer Davis Group and Traffic. The two men had played and recorded together two years earlier, and Clapton admired Winwood's tunefulness as a singer and songwriter - qualities that stood in sharp relief after the jazz-rock experimentalism of Cream.

But, given their musical pedigrees, Clapton and Winwood were hot commercial commodities. Because all three of its members had been eminent figures on the British scene, Cream had begun a trend toward supergroups, and the prospect of Winwood and Clapton teaming up was too hot a proposition for the business people to resist. What began idyllically with Clapton and Winwood jamming together at their homes in the country and searching for new musical directions, quickly became a cash cow. Ginger Baker and Rick Grech, bassist of the English folk-rock band Family, were recruited as the rhythm section, and Blind Faith was born.

Formed in early 1969, Blind Faith debuted at a huge outdoor concert in London's Hyde Park in June of that year, recorded one album and then launched an arena tour in America. The band broke up in late 1969, and Clapton offered this bluntly honest obituary in Rolling Stone shortly afterwards: "We didn't rehearse enough, we didn't get to know each other enough, we didn't go through enough trials and tribulations before the big time came."

Still, the Blind Faith album, recorded in February, May and June of 1969 had a number of splendid moments. Steve Winwood's searching "Can't Find My Way Home," with Clapton on acoustic guitar, is a fine example of the kind of melodic song-centered work Clapton was becoming more interested in after Cream. Among the earliest tunes Blind Faith layed down in the studio, Clapton's "Presence Of The Lord" was the first non-instrumental song he ever recorded that he wrote fully on his own. It was also the first of the hymn-like spiritual songs of faith that would become a staple of his work in years to come.

The opening act on the Blind Faith tour of America in 1969 was a rocking R&B band led by Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett. Delaney and Bonnie played a loose, engaging blend of the full range of American soul music, and their unassuming, good-hearted shows seemed to Clapton a sharp contrast to Blind Faith's headline gigs. Clapton began spending more and more time with Delaney and his band, traveling from gig to gig on their tour bus and popping up on stage during their sets. In a 1970 interview in Rolling Stone, Clapton recalled that "on certain nights I'd get up there and play tambourine with Delaney's group and enjoy it more than playing with Blind Faith... And by then I kind of got this crusade going for Delaney's group. I wanted to bring them over to England."

Blind Faith splinted once their blitz of America ended. At that point, Clapton not only sponsored a tour of England for Delaney and Bonnie, he played guitar with the band and recorded the infectiously upbeat single, "Comin' Home," with them. A live album from the tour was released later. More important, however, Delaney was the agent of a significant emotional breakthrough for Clapton.

Since about 1968, Clapton had been growing bored with virtuoso musicianship and more interested in songs that had clearly delineated structures and put across a pleasing groove. The Band's Music From Big Pink, which came out that year, made a striking impression on him and fueled his dissatisfaction with Cream. Discussing Cream's break-up in Rolling Stone in 1974, Clapton said "another interesting factor was that I got the tapes of Music From Big Pink and I thought, well, this is what I want to play - not extended solos and maestro bullshit but just good funky songs." The concise, melodic "Badge," which Clapton co-wrote for Cream's Goodbye album with George Harrison, who also plays guitar on the song, was one product of this interest. Forming a band with Steve Winwood and serving as a guitar-slinger side-man to Delaney and Bonnie were other manifestations of it.

Yet despite his strong performances on "Ramblin' On My Mind", "Crossroads" and other tracks, Clapton was still extremely shy about his singing. Clapton told Robert Palmer that on the night he and Delaney met, "Delaney looked straight into my eyes and told me I had a gift to sing and that if I didn't sing, God would take it away. I said 'No, man, I can't sing.' But he said, 'Yes, you can... That night we started talking about me making a solo album, with his band."

When Delaney and Bonnie's tour of England ended, the two men went into the studio in Los Angeles and began work on Clapton's first solo album, Eric Clapton. Delaney's influence on the record was considerable. He produced the album - which includes the joyful "Blues Power" and the fiery "Let It Rain" - and supplied most of the players from his own band. His hand is especially evident on the alternative version of J.J. Cale's "After Midnight" - which Delaney mixed and which features a horn section that does not appear on the LP track. With Delaney's encouragement, Clapton emerged as a front man for the first time since he had been propelled into superstardom with Cream. Clapton wrote or co-wrote eight of the eleven tunes on the record, sang all the lead vocals and played crisply and spiritedly. He was now ready to put together a band of his own.

When Clapton learned that three members of Delaney's band - keyboardist Bobby Whitlock, bassist Carl Radle and drummer Jim Gordon - had had a falling out with their boss and were available, he scooped them up. The band came together and did their first recording while they were all working on the sessions for George Harrison's All Things Must Pass album, which Phil spector was producing. They recorded a blistering version of "Tell the Truth" - backed with the salacious "Roll It Over," featuring Harrison and Dave Mason on guitars - as a single, with Spector at the board. But, at the band's insistence, the track was recalled within days of its release.

Still ambivalent about his rock-star status, Clapton avoided using his own name and debuted his new band at a benefit concert in London as Derek and the Dominos. And rather than play large halls, he booked a club tour of England for their first trip out. As undisputed leader of the Dominos, Clapton was able both to play songs he felt comfortable with and to stretch out in solos when he desired. "It wasn't until I formed Derek and the Dominos and we played live that I was aware of being able to do exactly what I wanted and was happy with it," Clapton told Dan Forte in 1985. But Clapton's musical satisfaction contrasted with the emotional pain he was experiencing. He had fallen in love with Pattie Boyd Harrison, who at the time was married to his best friend, George Harrison. With the turmoil of a classic blues triangle worthy of Robert Johnson exploding inside him, Clapton left for Miami with the Dominos to make Layla.

Layla was recorded with legendary producer Tom Dowd under the most extreme conditions. Critic Robert Palmer visited the sessions and later recalled, "There was a lot of dope around, especially heroin, and when I showed up, everyone was just spread out on the carpet, nodded out." Shortly after the band arrived in Miami, Dowd took them to see the Allman Brothers, and Duane Allman was invited to play slide guitar on the album. Allman also teamed up with Clapton for a duet on Little Walter's "Mean Old World," which was not included on the LP.

Driven creatively by his new band, the formidable playing of Allman and his own romantic agony, Clapton poured all he had into Layla's title track, which was inspired by a Persian love story he had read, The Story of Layla and Majnun by Nizami. The song's extended lyrical coda was composed independently by drummer Jim Gordon on piano, and Gordon had to be convinced to allow the piece to be tacked onto "Layla."

After completing Layla, Derek and the Dominos launched a tour of America, from which the previously unreleased live versions of "Key to the Highway" and "Crossroads" - in a more churning, exploratory rendition than the one recorded with Cream - included in this collection are taken. The band then returned to England, and in April and May of 1971 attempted to record a second studio album - five tracks of which are presented in this collection for the first time: "One More Chance," Arthur Crudup's "Mean Old Frisco," the instrumental "Snake Lake Blues," a cover of Willie Oixon's "Evil," and an uncompleted studio version of "Got to Get Better in a Little While," which the band performed live on the album, Derek and the Dominos in Concert. In his 1985 interview in Rolling Stone Clapton told Robert Palmer that the sessions for a follow-up LP to Layla "broke down halfway through because of the paranoia and the tension. And the band just... dissolved."

Once the Dominos broke up, Clapton's drug dependence worsened and kept him virtually a prisoner in his home for the rest of 1971 - though he did emerge to play at George Harrison's Concert for Bangladesh that summer - and much of the following year. During this period he felt both personally and emotionally adrift and the long standing identity issues arose once again. "The end of the Dominos came too soon, and that left me very high and dry as to what I was supposed to be," he told Guitar Player in 1985. "I'd been this anonymous person up until that time. It was difficult for me to come to terms with the fact that it was me, that I was on my own again."

Part of that difficulty may have resulted from the origins of Derek and the Dominos in Clapton's own psychic need. Despite the enormous satisfactions the band brought him, Clapton told Musician that Derek and the Dominos were "a make-believe band. We were all hiding inside it. Derek and the Dominos - the whole thing was... assumed. So it couldn't last. I had to come out and admit that I was being me. I mean, being Derek was a cover for the fact that I was trying to steal someone else's wife. That was one of the reasons for doing it so that I could write the song, and even use another name for Pattie. So Derek and Layla - it wasn't real at all."

Clapton's good friend Pete Townshend of the Who organized a concert at London's Rainbow Theatre in January of 1973 to create some momentum for the guitarist's return to action. Clapton played at the highly emotional show with Townshend, Ron Wood and Steve Winwood, and later that year took an acupuncture cure to end his drug addiction. Once that problem was behind him, Clapton contacted Tom Dowd and returned to Miami to record 461 Ocean Boulevard.

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4/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.0
Crash course in Clapton mostly works
Review written by John Fitzgerald, July 21st, 2005

Technically, John McVie is probably really only on “Hideaway” and “All your love” of the Mayall tracks here but as the “Bluesbreakers - With Eric Clapton” album is an essential purchase, McVie’s appearances here are redundant though the same can not be said about Dave Mason’s appearances as though you may get Delaney & Bonnie’s single only studio version of “Comin’ home” (on which Dave plays guitar) on various D & B releases, “Roll it over” was a track recorded by the short lived Derek & The Dominoes lineup that included Dave (who plays guitar & does vocals on this track as well, according to the liner notes) and at the time of recording this track they had been working with George Harrison
on the sessions for his sprawling solo outing “All things must pass” and RIO is an enjoyable slumpy track from those ATMP sessions that remained very hard to find until this box set arrived. Also, a previously unreleased outtake from Clapton’s solo “461 Ocean Boulevard” sessions called “Ain’t that lovin’ you” (also including Dave on guitar) is another easy laid back dragger. As for the rest of the box, here’s what comes to mind (for me, as I admit I’m not an expert on Clapton). I was surprised to see only the one Delaney & Bonnie track (I didn’t think there would be too many but since their “On tour with Eric Clapton” album was considered a high point for them, I thought they’d include
at least one track from that but this may have been a good move in the end as this box, with it’s 83 tracks, does successfully straddle the line of including enough essential previously heard Clapton career highlights to serve as a good Clapton crash course for the uninitiated and there’s a fairly large bunch of previously unreleased (and/or rare) material included to help clean things up for Claptonites. Speaking of “cleaning things up”, it would’ve been nice had “Something’s happening” from EC’s “Behind the sun” (with Lindsey on “additional rhythm guitar”) been included but I guess we can’t have
everything! Interesting how both “After midnight” and (perhaps more predictably) “Crossroads” appear twice throughout these proceedings but with the classic growling Cream version of “Crossroads” and the popular original (and equally as popular late 80’s remake of) “After midnight” they make useful bookends for the Clapton career retrospective angle here (to that date). I’m assuming the Yardbirds material included here is authoritative regarding specifically the Clapton era of the band though Page & Beck fans would probably suggest you get a fully comprehensive Yardbirds compilation instead
of this I’m sure. I found it interesting how half of the Mayall material is from the much (rightfully) praised “Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton” album and the other half was from recordings of poorer sound quality, maybe to capture the raw sound of the Beano album tracks to contrast with the more purist sounding oddities to keep the balance of power vs. traditional blues drenchings. The Cream material here is a virtual greatest hits of their shorter, more commercial sounding material and though some short tracks here do
squeeze in much blazing instrumental interplay (such as the previously unreleased run through here of “Steppin’ out” for instance), one may wish to seek out some live Cream recordings as the improvisation is what Cream were really known for. Also, the unreleased “Lawdy mama” before “Strange brew” may sound samey back to back like that. The Blind Faith material strikes me as trying to please all crowds, a rare track in “Sleeping in the ground” (for the hardcore fans), the one EC penned track from the BF album in “Presence
of the lord” (for those that wished this track to represent what he had brought to BF) and “Can’t find my way home” (for those who wished to have displayed Blind Faith’s general musical restraint in comparison to Cream’s previous wildness as by all accounts Eric wished to distance himself from the guitar god persona he had become known as in to a more low profile, background position, I suppose, like Peter Green had wished in a sense for himself at the time). I was surprised to see so many Derek & The Dominoes rarities included here considering how short lived D&TD were and they work surprisingly well,
though they may not be as improvisational as one may have hoped for in such tracks. The Clapton solo section is a good collection of hits and highlights but it does seem odd to me that most of the improvisational tracks in this box are actually from this part of his career as I tend to think of Clapton’s solo work being the LEAST improvisational out of his various career chapters and the early stuff is where I expected more improvisational material to crop up and instead we get less of it there. For instance, Clapton’s number one cover of Bob Marley’s “I shot the sheriff” here is not included here in it’s smash hit version but in an expanded live version which has grown on me and I confess that I quite like it but as most of the other Clapton “hits” from his solo years ARE present in their famous forms here (“Promises”, “Wonderful tonight”, “Lay down Sally” etc.), then why was this one, the one to chart the highest, not presented in it’s most well known form? Well, anyways, many agree that “Crossroads” is everything a box set should be and I’d have to agree with them for the most part so whatever disappointments you find in this set, you will undoubtedly find two plus points to counteract each negative one.

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Rest Of Liner Notes:

Featuring a band of American musicians, including Carl Radle, brought together by Dowd, 461 Ocean Boulevard is Clapton's great comeback LP. Appropriately, it opens with "Motherless Children," a traditional tune whose, rollicking energy in Clapton's slide-guitar version counterpoints its relevance to the circumstances of his early life. The deeply felt "Let It Grow" finds Clapton once again "standing at the crossroads," and this time making a choice to affirm life, love and, by extension, his ability to reach within himself and create art. And 461 Ocean Boulevard contained Clapton's cover of Bob Marley's "I Shot the sheriff" - represented here in a tougher, more expansive live rendition from the band's December 5th, 1974 concert at the Hammersmith Odeon in London - which exposed millions of Americans to reggae music for the first time when it became a Number One hit. During the 461 Ocean Boulevard sessions at Criteria Studios in Miami, Clapton also recorded Jimmy Reed's insinuatingly seductive 'Ain't That Lovin' You" with Dave Mason on guitar - a previously unreleased track included in this collection.

461 Ocean Boulevard re-established Clapton in both critical and commercial terms, but it also ushered in the phase of his career that engendered concern in many of his longest-standing followers. In their concentration on songwriting, vocals and melody, 461 Ocean Boulevard and the nine studio LPs that have followed it de-emphasize the pyrotechnic guitar work that characterized Clapton's tracks with the Bluesbreakers, Cream and Derek and the Dominos - though there's certainly no shortage of excellent playing. Working with a variety of producers - including Dowd, Glyn Johns and Phil Collins - Clapton alternated between American and British bands, experimenting with a wide variety of sounds and styles. Conventional pop songs and laid-back ballads of broad appeal appeared on those records and jarred the sensibilities of some fans.

A number of issues are important for understanding Clapton's music since 1974. One is that, while Clapton is still gripped by the blues and inclined to explore his favorite standards at length in live performance (note his probing reading of Otis Rush's "Double Trouble" in this collection), that impulse is no longer single and all-consuming. Since the latter days of Cream, the thrust of Clapton's music has been towards melody, and the artists that have interested him - the Band, Bob Dylan, Bob Marley, J.J. Cale, country singer Don Williams - are often more subtle than they are explosive. Taken together those artists and Clapton's blues idols are the influences behind his most notable work of the late Seventies and Eighties.

In 1985 Clapton spoke of a desire he felt during the Seventies "to be more of a composer of melodic tunes rather than just a player, which was very unpopular with a lot of people." The remark echoes something he said eleven years earlier, in expressing admiration for Stevie Wonder: "I think when it comes down to it, I always go for singers. I don't buy an album because I like the lead guitar. I always like the human voice most of all." The greatest blues guitar playing, after all, is modelled on the sound of the human voice.

Blues, country, folk, rock and pop have come to share a place in Clapton's music. He offered a sensitive reading of Elmore James' "The Sky Is Crying" on There's One in Every Crowd (in addition to recording James' "(When Things Go Wrong) It Hurts Me Too" during the sessions for that album), and, in a live cut from 1977 included here, did an upbeat take on "Further On Up the Road," which over the years has become one of his signature tunes. Members of the Band were a prominent presence on the gently rolling No Reason to Cry album, which featured Clapton's optimistic "Hello Old Friend." Bob Dylan appeared on that record as well, sharing the vocal on his enigmatic song, "Sign Language."

Clapton also turned in fine versions of Dylan's "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" - another expression of the guitarist's spiritual side - and his swinging "If I Don't Be There By Morning." J.J. Cale's ominously enticing "Cocaine," included on Clapton's 1977 multi-platinum LP, slowhand, has proven to be one of Clapton's most popular tunes, and Clapton's own catchy hit, "Lay Down Sally," from that same album, owes a clear debt to Cale. The affectionate "Wonderful Tonight," also from slowhand, was simply born of Clapton's wish to write a love song.

Clapton's popularity as a live performer has consistently grown over the past ten years, and his videos and the pop-oriented LPs he has made with producer Phil Collins - Behind the Sun and August {which was co-produced by Tom Dowd) - have brought his music to a younger audience eager to learn about his past. He composed sound tracks for the BBC television series Edge of Darkness, which won prestigious BAFTA and Ivor Novello awards in Great Britain, and for the film Lethal Weapon. He contributed songs to films, including "Heaven Is One Step Away" for Back to the Future and two tracks for The Color of Money, directed by Martin Scorsese.

As a blues prodigy, Clapton built a commanding reputation very early in his twenties. By the time he was thirty he had, like many masters, become intrigued by simplicity - the one-note philosophy. The calm that he felt at his core - through the times of revolutionary innovation, through the drugs and the cure, through heartbreak and happiness, at the crossroads and further on up the road - finally entered his music.

In Musician in 1986 Clapton said, "I think that the ultimate guitar hero should be a dispenser of wisdom, as well as anything else that's the one thing I will say that I'm still striving after, outside of perfection as a musician: the attainment of wisdom, in any amount."

If wisdom can be reflected in the creation of a superbly accomplished body of work and in the defeat of personal adversity, Eric Clapton has already achieved the major portion of his goal. And the remainder has not escaped him. It awaits him - and us, his audience - at the spectacular series of crossroads to come.

Anthony DeCurtis
Senior Writer
Rolling Stone

John Mayall's Bluesbreakers - Bluesbreakers With Eric Clapton (London)
Cream - Fresh Cream (Polydor)
Cream - Disreaeli Gears (Polydor)
Cream - Wheels Of Fire (Polydor)
Cream - Goodbye (Polydor)
Cream - Live Cream (Polydor)
Cream - Live Cream Volume Two (Polydor)
Blind Faith - Blind Faith (Polydor)
Delaney & Bonnie With Eric Clapton - On Tour (Atlantic)
Eric Clapton - Eric Clapton (Polydor)
Derek And The Dominoes - Layla (Polydor)
Derek And The Dominoes - In Concert (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - Rainbow Concert (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - 461 Ocean Boulevard (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - There's One In Every Crowd (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - E.C. Was Here (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - No Reason To Cry (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - Slowhand (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - Backless (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - Just One Night (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - Another Ticket (Polydor)
Eric Clapton - Money And Cigarettes (Warner Bros.)
Eric Clapton - Behind The Sun (Warner Bros.)
Eric Clapton - August (Warner Bros.)

Atlantic Recording Corporation
1641 Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10023

Artist: "Derek & The Dominoes"
Reel No.: 4 Master
Date: (None)
B. Criteria
Label: Atlantic
Producer: Tom Dowd
Engineer: Staff
Take No. (None)
Title: "Layla" 1st Section
Organ Bottom R2/0 1
Organ Top L-4/0 2
Eric & Duane (Duplicate Solos) M0/0 3
Duane (Solos) L0/5 4
Eric (Rhythm) M0/0 5
Bass L0/2 6
Drums (Left) L0/2 7
Drums (Right) R2/0 8
Eric (Guitar Harmony With Tr. 11 & 12) R2/0 9
Tambourine 0/0 Mo/o 10
Eric (Guitar Harmony With 9 & 12 L0/2 11
Eric (Guitar Harmony With 9 & 11 M0/0 12
Bobby (Chorus) R-3/0 13
Eric (Lead And Chorus) L0/-3 14
Chorus Double (Bobby) R-3/0 15
Chorus Double (Eric) Eric Lead (1st Uerge Only) L0/-3 16
Take No. (None)
Title: "Layla" 2nd Section 7:10
Organ Bottom R2/0 1
Organ Top L-4/0 2
Guitar Leslie (Left) Old M0/0 3
Guitar Leslie (Right) Old (Erased 10/15/70) L0/-5 4
Duane Old Bottleneck M0/0 5
Eric Box Guitar Reenforcement Of Lead Old 10/1/70 6
Drums Old Left L0/2 7
Drums Old Right R2/0 8
Duane Old 9/9/70 Use with Original R2/0 9
Percussion Old M0/0 10
Bass Old 9/9/70 L0/2 11
Cymbals (Right) Old 9/9 L0/2 12
Cymbals (Left) Old 9/9 R2/0 13
Piano Reenforcement Of Lead Old 10/1/70 14
Piano Bottom R-4/0 15
Piano Top L0/-4 16

This Compilation (P) (C) 1988 Polygram International Music B.V.

Marketed and Distributed in France by Island/Remark Records

All Rights of the Producer and of the Owner of the work reproduced Reserved. Unauthoruzed copying, reproduction, renting, hiring, lending, public performance and broadcasting prohibited.

Polydor

Chronicles

BIEM MCPS

PY 849

LC 0309

0 42283 5 9

"I Wish You Would" is by The Yardbirds
"Good Morning Little Schoolgirl" is by The Yardbirds
"For Your Love" is by The Yardbirds
"Hideaway" is by John Mayall's Bluesbreakers
"All Your Love" is by John Mayall's Bluesbreakers
"Ramblin' On My Mind" is by John Mayall's Bluesbreakers
"Comin' Home" is by Delaney & Bonnie
"She's Waiting" is by Eric Clapton

    Last Modified »
2015-05-12
    Tracklisting »
Discography entry submitted by Steve MacDougall & Jeff Kenney.