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Stone Country: Country Artists Perform The Songs Of The Rolling Stones (1997) - Various Artists


    Featuring »

Blackhawk, Deana Carter, Rodney Crowell, Ron Getman, Del Gray, Nanci Griffith, Porter Howell, Jeffrey Howard Huskins, George (Glenn) Jones, Sammy Kershaw, Tracy Lawrence, Little Texas, Dwayne O'Brien, Jamie Oldaker, Henry Paul, Duane Propes, Collin Raye, Walt Richmond, Steve Ripley, Dave/David Robbins, Tim Rushlow, Van Stephenson, The Tractors, Travis Tritt, Casey Van Beek

    Tracklisting »
Honky Tonk Women
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 4:18
  Comments: by Travis Tritt (appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records) Recorded at House Of David Recording Studios. Mixed at Starstruck Studios
Paint It Black
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 4:21
  Comments: by Tracy Lawrence (appears courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corporation) Recorded at The Castle Studios and Sound Stage Studios. Mixed at Sound Stage Studios.
Ruby Tuesday
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 3:35
  Comments: by Deana Carter (appears courtesy of Capitol Nashville) Recorded at Emerald Studio, Nashville, TN.
The Last Time
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 3:59
  Comments: by The Tractors (appear courtesy of Arista Records, Inc.) Recorded at The Church Studio, Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Jumpin' Jack Flash
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 4:01
  Comments: by Rodney Crowell (appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records) Recorded at Sound Kitchen, Franklin, Tennessee.
Angie
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 4:45
  Comments: by Sammy Kershaw (appears courtesy of Mercury Nashville) Recorded at The Castle, Nashville, TN.
Wild Horses
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 3:47
  Comments: by Blackhawk (appears courtesy of Arista Nashville) Recorded onto Fairlight MFX-3 Hard Disk System at Midtown Tone & Volume Recording Studios, Nashville, TN.
Brown Sugar
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 3:10
  Comments: by Collin Raye (appears courtesy of Epic Records) Recorded and Mixed at Soundstage Studio. Mastered at Masterfonics.
Beast Of Burden
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 4:50
  Comments: by Little Texas (appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records) Recorded at Ardent Studios, Memphis, TN and Loud Studios, Nashville, TN. Mixed at Ardent Studios, Memphis, TN
No ExpectationsLyrics available
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 3:56
  Comments: by Nanci Griffith (appears courtesy of Elektra Entertainment) Recorded and Mixed at Jack's Tracks Recording Studio, Nashville, TN.
Time Is On My Side
  Date Performance: 1997, Running Time: 2:47
  Comments: by George Jones (appears courtesy of MCA Nashville, a division of MCA Records, Inc.) Recorded & Mixed at House Of David Recording Studios.
    Guest Appearances »

David/Dave Angell, Eddie Bayers, Dennis Bellf(i)eld, Bekka Bramlett, David Briggs, Pat Buchanan/Bucannon, Larry Byrom/Byrum/Byron, Butch Carr, John Catchings, Joe Chemay, J.T. Corenflos, Chad Cromwell, David Davidson, Ron De La Vega, Jerry Douglas, Dan Dugmore, Glen Duncan, Stuart/Stewart Duncan, Conni(e) Ellisor, Chris Farren, Larry Franklin, Paul Franklin, Sonny Garrish, Carl Gor(o)detzky, Kenny Greenberg, James/Jim Grosjean, Rob Hajacos, Tony Harrell, John Hobbs, James Hooker, Jim/James R. Horn, Bobby Huff, Bill Hullett, Greg Jennings, Doug Lancio, Bob/Robert Mason, Pat McInerney, Greg Morrow, Dale Oliver, Dave (David W.) Pomeroy, Norbert Putman, Michael Rhodes, Hargus (Pig) Robbins, Brent Rowan, John Wesley Ryles, Vince Santoro, Lee Satterfield, Eric Silver, Pam(ela) Sixfin, Milton Sledge, Steuart Smith, Summer Smith, Joe Spivey, Steve Turner, Alan Umstead, Gary Vasondale/VanOsdale, Cindy Walker (Richardson), Billy (Joe) Walker(, Jr.), Biff Watson, Bergen White, John (D.) Willis, Dennis Wilson, Lonnie Wilson, Norro Wilson, Glen(n) (A.) Worf, Curtis Wright, Reese Wynans, Reggie Young, Curtis Young

    Released »

1997-09-30

    Format »

Domestic Vinyl/CD Album

    Other Appearances »
Mick Jagger (Songwriter), Mick Jagger (Songwriter), (Jordan) Jerry Ragovoy (Norman Meade) (Songwriter), Keith Richard(s) (Songwriter), Keith Richard(s) (Songwriter), Gabrielle Raumberger (Art Direction), Joseph Kiely (Design), Cliff Singontiko (Design), Tim Coyle (Assistant Engineer), Tony Green (Assistant Engineer), Pete Miskinis (Assistant Engineer), Paula Montondo/Montando (Assistant Engineer), Daryl Rodbush (Assistant Engineer), Allen Kovac (Executive Producer), Randy Nicklaus (Executive Producer), Nancy Lee Tuck (Production Assistant), Greg Wilkinson (Production Assistant), Robert K. Oermann (Liner Notes), Ginny Johnson Incorporated (Production Coordinator), Mike (Frog) Griffith (Production Coordinator), Ginny Johnson (Production Coordinator), Jennifer Rose (Production Coordinator), Wayne Rosso (Concept By), Flip Anderson (Produced By), Blackhawk (Produced By), David Briggs (Produced By), Mark Bright (Produced By), Deana Carter (Produced By), Rodney Crowell (Produced By), Christy DiNapoli (Produced By), Chris Farren (Produced By), Doug Grau (Produced By), Nanci Griffith (Produced By), Tracy Lawrence (Produced By), Henry Paul (Produced By), Henry Paul (Produced By), Walt Richmond (Produced By), Walt Richmond (Produced By), Steve Ripley (Produced By), Steve Ripley (Produced By), Dave/David Robbins (Produced By), Dave/David Robbins (Produced By), Jim Rooney (Produced By), Keith Stegall (Produced By), Van Stephenson (Produced By), Van Stephenson (Produced By), James Stroud (Produced By), Billy (Joe) Walker(, Jr.) (Produced By), Mike/Michael D. Clute (Engineered By), John Kelton (Engineered By), Kevin Be(a)mish (Recorded By), Butch Carr (Recorded By), Joe Costa (Recorded By), John Hampton (Recorded By), Tom Hitchcock (Recorded By), Bruce Irvine (Recorded By), Mark Miller (Recorded By), Eric Pinson (Recorded By), Steve Ripley (Recorded By), Steve Ripley (Recorded By), Duane Scott (Recorded By), David/Dave Thoener (Recorded By), Kevin Be(a)mish (Mixed By), Butch Carr (Mixed By), Mike/Michael D. Clute (Mixed By), John Hampton (Mixed By), Tom Hitchcock (Mixed By), David Leonard (Mixed By), Steve Marcantonio/Markantonio (Mixed By), Mark Miller (Mixed By), Eric Pinson (Mixed By), Steve Ripley (Mixed By), Steve Ripley (Mixed By), David/Dave Thoener (Mixed By), Steve/Stephen Hall (Mastered By), Glen(n) Meadow(s) (Mastered By), David Briggs (Arranged By), Patty Nichols (Production Coordination), Mark Sullivan (Production Coordination), Derek Bason (Recording Assisted By), Derek Bason (Mixing Assisted By), Tim Waters (Mixing Assisted By), Randy Nicklaus (A&R Direction), Terry W. Bates (Additional Engineering By), Julian King (Additional Engineering By), Tim Kish (Additional Engineering By), Brian David Willis (Additional Engineering By), Ricky Cobble (Additional Engineering Assisted By), Pete Matthews (Additional Engineering Assisted By), Michael Preston (A&R Coordination), Hank DeVito (Photo (Rodney Crowell)), Greg Gorman (Photo (Travis Tritt)), Caroline Greyshock (Photo (Collin Raye)), Jim (Senor) McGuire (Photo (Tracy Lawrence)), Jim (Senor) McGuire (Photo (The Tractors)), Jim (Senor) McGuire (Photo (Nanci Griffith)), Peter Nash (Photo (George Jones)), Norman Jean Roy (Photo (Little Texas)), Pamela Springsteen (Photo (Sammy Kershaw)), Mark Tucker (Photo (Deana Carter)), Mark Tucker (Photo (Blackhawk))

    Record Label »
Beyond Music

    Catalogue Number »

BYCD3055

    Running Time »

43:27

    Liner Notes »

You might say that this album began in 1955. That was the year that Bill Haley and his band of hillbilly boppers took "Rock Around the Clock" to England. Riots ensued wherever they played. They left slashed cinema seats and wrecked theaters in their wake. British youth was never the same.

You could make a case for this album's genesis occurring in 1956. That was the year that a young Keith Richards put his ear up against his radio speaker, transfixed by the sound of country picker Scotty Moore churning up audio froth behind Elvis Presley. Keith still idolizes Scotty to this day and frequently cites "I'm Left You're Right She's Gone" and "Heartbreak Hotel" as his most inspiring guitar moments.

Years earlier, little Mick Jagger had met his neighbor Keith on the playground. One boy asked the other what he wanted to be when he grew up. Keith replied that he wanted to be a cowboy like Roy Rogers and play the guitar.

Maybe that's what started all this.

Or maybe it was the day in 1958 when a starstruck Mick went to see rockabilly great Buddy Holly and his Crickets band in concert during their tour of England.

Maybe it was in 1963. That was the year the newly formed Rolling Stones went on tour themselves for the first time. They were an opening act on a package show starring Nashville's Everly Brothers.

In 1964 The Stones recorded Buddy Holly's "Not Fade Away" and Hank Snow's "I'm Movin' On." In 1965 the group toured the American South for the first time, performing in Nashville's Municipal Auditorium on Nov. 16th. Such musical connections seem scattered throughout the illustrious history of The Rolling Stones.

The group's 1968-73 friendship and collaboration with country-rock star Gram Parsons has been much discussed by fans of both acts. The "Country Honk" recording on Let It Bleed is one direct result of that relationship; and tracks on the Beggar's Banquet and Exile on Main Street albums also indicate it. At various times, "Sweet Virginia," "Tumbling Dice" and "Torn and Frayed" have all been cited as Parsons-influenced Stones performances. The Stones recall that Gram turned them on to records by Merle Haggard, Jimmie Rodgers, Lonnie Mack, George Jones and Hank Williams during their time together. He, on the other hand, was deeply influenced by their rock-star lifestyle and attitude.

You see, influence in the music world is quite often a two~way street. Although it would be a stretch to say that The Stones left an indelible mark on modern country music, their songs have been sprinkled on Nashville albums from time to time - ranging from Johnny Cash's 1978 reading of "No Expectations" to John Anderson's lively 1985 treatment of "It's All Over Now."

Charlie Walker charted with "Honky Tonk Women" in 1970, and since then the song has also been sung by Hank Williams Jr., Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. The Flying Burrito Brothers and Old & In the Way have tackled "Wild Horses." In 1980 Johnny Cash recorded "The Last Time." J.D. Crowe & The New South took "As Tears Go By" to biuegrass fans. Tom T. Hall, Earl Scruggs, Steve Young and Bill Keith all did "No Expectations" years ago. And you would be foolish not to admit that every contemporary performer in Nashville listened to the world's greatest rock band at some time in their life.

Maybe this whole thing was ignited when Keith Richards came to Music City to record "Say It's Not Me" with George Jones in 1994. Then again, it could have been those 1996 sessions with Nashville's D.J. Fontana and Scotty Moore for the All The King's Men CD.

Whenever this project "started," it surely has been gestating for a long, long time. Whether you want to point to the rockabilly invasion of England in the 1950s, the British invasion of America in the 1960s or the country-rock experiments of the 1970s, there has never been a time when the music of The Rolling Stones has not been colored by their cousins on the other side of the Atlantic.

It's time for a payback. During the past few months country stars have been gathering in Nashville's studios to offer a tip of the Stetson to The Rolling Stones. The result is Stone Country.

If you want proof that music is truly a universal language, this is the record. Rock's baddest bad boys and country's youth brigade would seem to have little in common. But Nashville is first and foremost a songwriters' town; and the Jagger/Richards compostions are nothing if not first-rate examples of craftsmanship. Thus, as each tune kicks off you'll find both a smile of recognition and a jolt of surprise at how easily it "translates."

Is there any doubt in your mind that rebel Travis Tritt is the perfect choice for "Honky Tonk Women?" Backed by the blazing electric guitars of Pat Bucannan and former Steppenwolf member Larry Byrom, Tritt and ex-Fleetwood Mac wailer Bekka Bramlett roar through this Stones classic like it was tailored just for them.

Tracy Lawrence takes "Paint It Black" down a backwoods lane, the vocal mixed up front, country style. Dave Pomeroy's heartbeat bass and Tony Harrell's B-3 organ are nearly as prominent in the performance as Brent Rowan's imitation of the famous Middle Eastern guitar riff that ruled the original version.

Deana Carter brings a fragile innocence to "Ruby Tuesday," making the character seem far more wistful than she was 30 years ago. Tulsa's percolating combo The Tractors turn "The Last Time" into a rollicking two step. Rodney Crowell gives "Jumpin' Jack Flash" a hepcat workout.

Two of the most startling transformations come from Sammy Kershaw and BlackHawk. "Angie" becomes a surprisingly effective country vehicle with Sammy's phrasing, Stuart Duncan's fiddling and Paul Franklin's steel guitar. BlackHawk's bluegrass-meets-country rock arrangement of "Wild Horses" is immensely refreshing. The sizzling picking spotlights Van Stephenson's acoustic guitar and sideman Eric Silver's mandolin. The flawless harmony blend that happens when group member Stephenson and Dave Robbins join lead singer Henry Paul on the choruses is an undeniable highlight of this Stones salute.

Master showman Collin Raye takes on "Brown Suqar," and his vocal sure makes the spicy proceedings sound like a whole lot of fun. Little Texas gives "Beast of Burden" a Southern drawl. Previously known as a part of Bette Midler's pop repertoire, the song works extremely well as a country lyric, perhaps because of its poor-but-proud theme.

"No Expectations" is a drawling, acoustic shuffle in the hands of Nanci Griffith and the Nashville pickers. Doug Lancio's resonator guitar and James Hooker's B-3 organ are particular standouts.

Finally, there is "Time Is On My Side" as interpreted by the incomparable George Jones. With its string section, soft choral harmonies, mid-song recitation and Sonny Garrish steel guitar, this is a classic Nashville Sound outing.

Stone Country might not win The Roiling Stones an invitation to appear on The Grand Ole Opry any time soon. But it does remind us that great songs belong to everyone, whether they come from a back street in London or a back porch in Tennessee.

And as they say on Music Row, the proof is in the picking.

Robert K. Oermann

THANK YOU
Jeff Sydney, Bruce Tenenbaum, Tom Siiverman, Dan Hoffman, Phil Kovac, Wayne Rosso, Andy Hewitt, Jordan Berliant, Ed Thomas, Holly Browde, Liz Silverman Ring, Jed Grodin, Carol Sloat, Laure Dunham, Lewis Kovac, Jimmy Bowen, Allan Rider, David Briggs, Sandy Friedman, Jeff Kempler, Esq., Gary Falcon, Ken Kragen, Rick Alter, Tina Smith, Steve Ripley, Burt Stein, Julie Devereux, Steve Cox, Christy DiNapOli, Evelyn Shriver, Tim Dubois, Jim Ed Norman, James Stroud, Luke Lewis, Scott Hendricks, Rick Blackburn, Paul Worley, Tony Brown, Bruce Hinton, Lori Lousararian, Ashley Smith.

Mastered at Future Disc

(C) (P) 1997 Beyond Music
Manufactured and distributed by Tommy Boy Music
902 Broadway
New York, New York 10010

All rights reserved.

Unauthorized duplication is a violation of applicable laws.

Compact Disc Digital Audio

6 39857 2 7

    Reviews »
Add your review here.

3/5.03/5.03/5.03/5.03/5.0
Good, but get the Stones greatest hits instead
Review written by John Fitzgerald, June 1st, 2005

The lead off track, Travis tritt's version of "Honky tonk woman" is the song here on which you'll hear Bekka and you hear her pretty good. It's a faithful cover with good clarity on the chorus high notes but like many songs here, although well done, there's not many surprises present. However, there is a radically different version of "Wild horses" by Blackhawk and there are likable performances by many artists enclosed in this package but one still feels that they would be better off with the Stones greatest hits compilations if they had the yearning for these songs.

4/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.0
Virtuosic tributes, with interesting variations
Review written by Dave Allen, June 1st, 2005

Based on "No Expectations" alone, I've decided to go out and buy this disc. Why should anyone question the 'country' take on Stones' music? These brave individuals have carried off the rare event - tribute without fawning or cloning, but with sustained interest. I miss "Far Away Eyes", but I guess that would have been too obvious an inclusion. A feast of virtuosic covers, with licensed departures from Memorex.

    Last Modified »
2011-04-18
    Tracklisting »
Discography entry submitted by Golf4lynn & Marty Adelson.