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(4.20/5.04.20/5.04.20/5.04.20/5.04.20/5.0 from 5 Reviews)

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It really sounds like from heaven! (5/5.05/5.05/5.05/5.05/5.0)
Review written by J.C.Alexandres from Canfield, Ohio, USA, January 7th, 2012

Stumbled with Bob's latest work while reviwing my e-mail, thank you Hard Rock Cafe! I am surprised of the nice content and quality writing Bob did put in this compilation, it really sounds great, I hope the CD is released to the public soon.

Weston's Talents Are Close To Heavenly (4/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.0)
Review written by By Edward R. Schwab from St. Louis, MO, August 30th, 2005

This CD is far from predictable. Copying the pastiche-like approach he had done on the album "Penguin" with the rest of his Mac coleagues, Weston delivers a cross between a Mercedes-Benz and a monster truck on this outing. Quite frankly, why this album isn't commercially available is as unfathomable as it is disheartening. Here, he proves his clout as not just an excellent and honed guitarist, but also a vocalist as well. He further surprises the listener by presenting near-copies of the guitar work of both Buckingham and Green. Lady Hurricane is an example of what it would have sounded like had Weston been a part of the Rumours lineup; an acoustic and cryptic masterpiece. "Icarus Wings" is a delightful intermingling of bright autoharp and guitar in an almost-Beach boys style. "Troubled Man", however, is the shining star on this set (and destined to be the first release, if the CD ever sees the prosperity it deserves). With Green-influenced guitar soloing and an almost jazz-funk delivery. "All The Love In The World" is almost entirely sang by Weston's backup singer Lenae, who proves here, that she is also long overdue for noteriety. Overall, I actually tried to find something un-perfect about this album, and the only thing I was left with was wanting more...

Weston covers the bases. (4/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.0)
Review written by chiliD, September 1st, 2004

Just got a copy of Bob Weston's latest solo album.

Trying to keep the expectations to a minimum, and really never knowing what Bob's VOICE is like, I plopped it into the player...(I'm just typing my thoughts here upon my very first listen through)

There's A Heaven Above-a funky soft rock/R&B feel. Duet between Bob W. & Lianne Carrol...sounds kind of Kenny Loggins-ish, only infinitely BETTER.

Icarus Wings-another duet; an uptempo country-ish feel (think "She's Changing Me" from Heroes Are Hard To Find) with a bass line that is MORE than reminiscent of Otis Redding's "Can't Turn You Loose"...acoustic guitar really drives the beat

Lady Hurricane-a kind of spacey feel...Indian Tablas are the featured percussion...acoustic guitar with open tuning, overall song has a very Stephen Stills feel (think "4+20")

Walkin' Blues-NOT the Robert Johnson song, but a cool groove tune sort of Steely Dan meets Ry Cooder...with some great slide guitar work.

Troubled Man-Bob gets into a smooth jazz groove here...again a Steely Dan/Michael McDonald-era Doobie Bros feel...with some guitar fills that I could've sworn were played by Larry Carlton or Lee Ritenour...but, no it's Bob.

Enigma Files-instrumental-opens with a pseudo-Flamenco guitar, then transforms into an almost spy-movie soundtrack type feel with thick keyboards and multi-layers of guitars.

De Da Do Do (for Dixie)--a short little acoustic guitar instrumental ditty with a Dixieland jazz feel.

Walk Away--a 12/8 blues feel instrumental...one that Bob's blues roots show through...this could be either a Splinter Group tune or a Rick Vito tune.

Indian Blue--another instrumental with multi-layers of guitars, harmonica and tablas...a very Mississippi Delta feel, BUT, the addition of the tablas give it that East Indian feel (sort of Ravi Shankar meets Robert Johnson & Muddy Waters!). My favorite tune on the album upon the first go 'round...sor far, that is.

Shaken Not Stirred-instrumental...a very "loungy" Latin jazz feel...nylon string guitar, piano, bass & percussion...sort of picks up where Eric Clapton's "Reptile" (the song) leaves off. Also, has alot of Django Reinhardt influence as well. I picture an old nightclub from the '30's or '40's with the audience in formal wear, martini glasses with the small bamboo umbrellas.

Letting Go-obviously NOT the Wings tune But, this has a groove that initially seems like a cross between Paul McCartney's acoustic things and a Stephen Stills solo acoustic stuff...but the drums & bass lay down a nice driving, but subtle groove. Throughout the vocal tunes, it surprises me that Bob's voice is smoother and higher than I had expected...I thought his voice would be gruffer than it is...more like Dave Mason's...but, I'm glad I was wrong.

Night Hawk-the electric guitar takes center stage on this...many groove changes from driving to light & lilting...again, lots of layered guitars, but the one out front lead guitar is what I had in my mind...the sudden end is a bit of a shock...but its a quick segue into...

All The Love In The World--Lianne Carrol takes the vocal lead on this one...a bit of a Carribbean/Calypso-esque feel to this one...as it starts, I can hear in my head Christine McVie singing this one...WOW! The chorus comes in and it shifts from the Carribbean feel to a West African feel...thick vocal choruses make it sound like it could be a left over song from "The Lion King"...I love this one! Great album closer.

And, there you have it.

This one grows on you (4/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.0)
Review written by (dkinblu@aol.com), September 1st, 2004

I always loved Weston's guitar playing and this CD is no exception.The vocals are what is surprising,this guy can sing and with the beautiful Cianne Carrol you get that Fleetwood Mac sound.Talk about a musician who has matured and aged like fine wine.I love this CD and the more I listen the more I hear.

There's a guitarist that can play any style (4/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.04/5.0)
Review written by John Fitzgerald from Peabody, MA USA, September 1st, 2004

Although to me, the instrumentals are the best moments, there are some wonderful vocal moments on this album such as the uplifting opener "There's a heaven above" which then kicks into the pulsating "Icarus wings" in which the rhythm reminds me of "I can't turn you loose" by Otis Redding but with more listens becomes very individual indeed. My favorite vocal number is the third song "Lady hurricane". It has an urgent acoustic guitar riff that leads into some heartfelt bluesy vocals which show that Weston is a competent vocalist and it's so great to hear him on lead which we so rarely do. The instrumentals really show Bob's prowess at successfully handling a wide range of musical styles and how much of a catch he must be for his soundtrack work. The epic enterpiece of the album "Enigma files" starts us on our way in which the first three minutes consist of echo drenched acoustic guitar which can remind one of his work on Ashkan's "Stop (wait and listen)" but very emotionally moving stuff which then gives way to the second half which has a grabbing funky rhythm led by Weston's glistening watery electric six string works. "De da do da (for Dixie)" is a entertaining homespun ditty while "Walk away" is ultra ice cool blues not unlike Rick Vito's "Exotica by night" was. "Indian blue" gets the slide going on the acoustic which is most atmospheric, you can actually picture walking through the hot southern reservations then turning into a fast run once the hypnotic rhythm kicks in. "Shaken not stirred" is all of the best elements of lounge music available anywhere and "Night hawk" is irresistible voltage like Dire Straits at their most rocking and funky. A real must have for anyone interested in finding out not only more about Bob Weston but what he can do. You will be impressed.

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